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Hands–on experience in milling | KRVN Radio

Hands–on experience in milling

Hands–on experience in milling
Fran Churchill, NAMA Instructor, at the K-State Department of Grain Science and Industry shows how the bench top mills in Shellenberger Hall work to participants (L–R) Tracy Butt and Samantha Kumarasinghe. (Courtesy of KSU-IGP Institute)

MANHATTAN, Kan. — Since the late 1800s flour milling has served an important role in the Kansas economy. The increased demand globally for milled products has made education about the process crucial for a stable supply. The IGP Institute at Kansas State University and the International Association of Operative Millers teamed up to offer the IAOM-KSU Introduction to Flour Milling course August 13-17, 2018 at the IGP Institute.

The course hosted eight participants from four different countries including Canada, Korea, Sri Lanka and the United States.

This course is a combination of lectures taught by K–State staff, a visit to the Kansas Wheat Innovation Center and hands-on training in the Hal Ross Flour Mill, Shellenberger Baking Lab and the Shellenberger Milling Lab.

“Participants received a well-rounded education on the milling industry, as we covered the milling process starting with growing wheat and ending with the baked products,” says Shawn Thiele, flour milling and grain processing curriculum manager at the IGP Institute. He adds, “This allows participants to understand the whole process of producing flour.”

In this course, the topics covered included overview of the U.S. milling industry; wheat production, supply and demand; wheat classes, uses, and basic wheat chemistry; wheat cleaning and conditioning; gradual reduction process overview; milling math (extraction, tempering and blending); principles of mill flow sheets; overview of the general milling process and major milling equipment; flour and dough testing practices and methods; flour functionality; wheat and flour blending; grade, quality, and mill performance on flour extraction.

As participant Scott Osborne, vice president of innovation at Mennel Milling reflects back on the course he says, “The most enjoyable part was the hands-on component. I believe you learn in four ways, reading, watching, doing, and teaching.” He has recently moved into this role and has been learning more about grain science through reading and watching. He says, “I now had the chance to do, which is what made it useful for me, the chance to do hands-on activities.”

This course is suited for anyone involved in the milling industry including but not limited to new mill employees, HR staff, ingredient procurement managers, and feed and flour sales representatives. In addition to flour milling and grain processing, the IGP Institute offers courses in the areas of grain marketing and risk management and feed manufacturing and grain quality management. To learn more about these other training opportunities, visit the IGP Institute website at www.ksu.edu/igp

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