Tag Archives: Blizzard

LINCOLN, NEB. – “President Trump’s signing of the disaster assistance bill is tremendous news and an important step forward in helping Nebraska farm and ranch families and our rural communities recover from the March flooding and blizzards in our state.”

“This disaster bill includes roughly $3 billion to cover crop damage, including additional funding for farmers prevented from planting due to the floods, as well as payments for on-farm stored grain that was damaged in these flooding events. The bill also provides $558 million in funding for the Emergency Conservation Program, the primary program farmers and ranchers can utilize for fence repair and debris removal, including clearing sand from farm fields.”

“We want to thank the entire Nebraska Congressional delegation for their support for the disaster assistance package and for President Trump signing this package into law.”

“We urge USDA to move forward as quickly as possible in developing the rules and implementing the key programs so they can be put to work in helping Nebraskans.”

This year the Nebraska Legislature passed LB 512 which provides property tax relief to owners of real property adversely affected by natural disasters on or after January 1 and before July 1. In order to qualify, the property owner must file Form 425 with the county assessor and the county clerk on or before July 15. Click Here to be directed to the Form 425 on the Nebraska Department of Revenue’s website.

From the Department of Revenue
The Department of Revenue, Property Assessment Division, has posted a new form to the website for Report of Destroyed Real Property, Form 425, pursuant to 2019 Neb. Law LB 512.

For real property that has suffered significant damage as a result of a calamity occurring on or after January 1 and before July 1 of the current assessment year, the property owner may file the Report of Destroyed Real Property with the county assessor and the county clerk on or before July 15. The county board of equalization will consider the report to determine any adjustments to the assessed value for the current year.

Calamity means a disastrous event, including but not limited to, a fire, an earthquake, a flood, a tornado, or other natural event which significantly affects the assessed value of the property.

If you have any questions, please contact the Nebraska Department of RevenuePolicy/Legal Section of the Property Assessment Division. at (402) 471-5984

A Senate-passed disaster aid bill, covering this year’s historic Midwest floods, finally cleared the U.S. House Monday, after enough Republicans joined Democrats in voting for the bill.

A majority of House Republicans broke ranks with conservatives, giving Democrats the two-thirds majority needed to pass the $19-billion disaster aid bill under rules for expedited action.

Conservatives, three-times during the Memorial Day recess, blocked the unanimous-consent needed to approve the Senate-passed measure that President Trump says he will sign.

They objected to voting on the unpaid-for bill with most members gone during the recess, and Democrats’ refusal to provide administration-requested humanitarian border aid.

Democratic Leader Steny Hoyer pushed back…

The measure includes $3-billion for farm related losses of crops, dairy, on-farm stored crops, prevented planting and more, covering the historic Midwest floods and earlier storms in the Southeast and Puerto Rico, and wildfires in the West.

The legislation was earlier delayed in the Senate over new Puerto Rico hurricane aid, including food stamps.

President Trump argued existing aid was mismanaged, but agreed to the food stamp money, and Republicans added new redevelopment aid, winning enough support from Democrats to pass the bill by a wide margin in the Senate.

Congressman Adrian Smith (R-NE) released the following statement after the House of Representatives passed legislation to provide assistance for presidentially declared disasters, including the March 2019 “bomb cyclone” which struck Nebraska. This vote came after the Senate recently voted in favor of this bill, and will now be sent to the President’s desk.

“I am glad we were able to come together and provide much needed relief to areas of our country, including Nebraska, which have been so devastated by natural disasters. We can now push further ahead with recovery efforts. Thousands of Nebraskans were affected by blizzards, rain, wind, and flooding, and this is another step as we rebuild.”

Congressman Jeff Fortenberry (R-NE) made the following statement today on the House passage of the disaster assistance package.

“I am pleased that the House has passed this funding bill so that assistance can soon reach the individuals, communities, and military installations, such as Offutt, in need of this relief.  This is great news for Nebraskans and others who have been affected by natural disasters in recent months.  Clearly, much more work and funding is necessary, but this legislation is a meaningful step forward as we continue the flood recovery efforts.”

The final version of the disaster relief bill includes a number of provisions that are of particular importance to Nebraska.  “I worked with my colleagues to add funds to the military operations and maintenance account with the intentionality that as much as $120 million will go to the immediate cleanup and operational needs of Offutt Air Force Base,” Fortenberry said.  “I also helped to provide additional funds for the Emergency Watershed Protection Program to restore scarred lands and infrastructure.  This important relief for our nation’s environmental security will reshape eroded stream banks, repair water control structures, fix levees, and restore conservation priorities,” Fortenberry added.  Among other items, the legislation also provides funds for emergency conservation projects on farms, levee repairs, and highway reconstruction.

Fortenberry said, “Nebraskans are resilient, determined, and generous.  This federal assistance will help accelerate the recovery work of communities and individuals and allow Nebraska to remain strong.”

WASHINGTON — The Senate on Thursday passed a bipartisan deal that would provide more than $19 billion in disaster aid funding to parts of the United States hit by hurricanes, flooding, earthquakes and wildfires, following months of negotiation.

Senators backed the measure, 85-8, just a few hours after the agreement was reached. The House will have to vote on the bill before it’s sent to Trump’s desk. House lawmakers have already left for their recess, but the chamber could still pass it quickly through unanimous consent.

“I totally support it,” Trump said of the legislation at a White House event on Thursday.

Leaving a closed-door Senate Republican lunch earlier in the day, Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby, R-Ala., told reporters that an agreement had been reached.

He said that he had spoken to President Donald Trump on Thursday afternoon about the parameters of the deal, which excluded the $4.5 billion in border funding that the White House and the Republicans kept demanding.

The Senate voted on the measure Thursday afternoon before leaving Washington for a weeklong Memorial Day recess. This comes after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., warned earlier in the day that the upper chamber would remain in session this week until they passed a disaster aid bill.

According to a breakdown of the bill from Shelby’s office, it provided about $900 million to Puerto Rico, which was ravaged by Hurricane Maria in 2017. That money would go toward nutrition assistance and a community development block grant, both of which were key Democratic priorities.

The bill also included a provision that would require the Trump administration to make almost $9 billion in previously withheld aid available to Puerto Rico, according to a summary of the bill provided by Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., ranking member on the Senate Appropriations Committee.

Funding for Puerto Rico had long been a sticking point in negotiations because Trump was opposed to giving the territory more aid. In April, he falsely claimed on Twitter that “Puerto Rico got 91 billion dollars for the hurricane” when the federal government had only allocated $40 billion for the island’s recovery and most of it hasn’t reached it yet.

https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/congress/senate-strikes-deal-19-billion-disaster-relief-bill-excludes-border-n1009396?cid=sm_npd_nn_tw_ma

LINCOLN, NEB. – “We looked around and didn’t know where to start. The devastation was so overwhelming, but the check we received from the Nebraska Farm Bureau Disaster Relief Fund helped us take the first step and know that we are not alone. We are so grateful,” said Tom and Fran Geisler, who farm and raise cattle near Hooper.

“The kindness and generosity of people across Nebraska and the United States is humbling,” said Steve Nelson, Nebraska Farm Bureau president. “More than $2 million has been collected for the Nebraska Farm Bureau Disaster Relief Fund, with 100 percent of funds raised going to farmers, ranchers, and rural communities in need of assistance,” said Nelson.

According to the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency (NEMA), 104 cities, 81 counties, and five tribal areas have had emergency declarations. The cost of the damage by the Nebraska Department of Agriculture is estimated at $440 million in crop losses; and $400 million in cattle losses. Other estimates include $449 million in damages to roads, levees, and other infrastructure across the state.

“For us to continue to rebuild our farms, ranches, and rural communities, it will take patience and perseverance to get through the magnitude of the loss and destruction,” said Nelson. “While the response to this fund has been overwhelming, we have seen requests for aid come into the Disaster Relief Fund totaling more than what we currently have in the fund. The amount we have raised doesn’t meet the assistance already requested, and additional applications are received each day.”

The fund was established at the Nebraska Farm Bureau Foundation, a 501(c)(3) charitable nonprofit, so donations meet the criteria for qualified charitable contributions for tax purposes.

“When we first started the fund, the immediate need in rural areas was water, food, shelter, and medicine for people and animals,” said Megahn Schafer, executive director of the Nebraska Farm Bureau Foundation.

“As health and safety situations stabilize, other needs have emerged, including clearing flood debris from pastures, fields, and homes; rebuilding fences to protect livestock; paying for extra fuel to deliver hay to stranded cattle; and helping restore fresh water to residents and animals in places like Boyd County,” said Schafer.

At Chance Ridge near Elkhorn, funds from the Nebraska Farm Bureau Disaster Relief Fund have been used to buy fuel, food, and lodging for those volunteering to help with clean up. “We serve as a delivery hub for hay and other supplies,” said Autumn Rock of Chance Ridge Event Center. “Because of the Nebraska Farm Bureau Disaster Relief Fund, we were able to help more than 150 farmers from across the state and keep more than 10-thousand head of cattle alive. This fund is truly making a difference.”

The need for assistance, both short term and long term, continues to grow. Each day there are different requests, and the Nebraska Farm Bureau Disaster Relief Fund stands ready to help farmers, ranchers, and rural communities.

“The repairs and recovery from this disaster will take a huge amount of resources. The next step is to provide support for intermediate and long-term recovery efforts in areas where there are gaps in availability of insurance coverage and government assistance,” said Nelson.

“We continue to seek financial donations to meet the growing aid requests coming into the Disaster Relief Fund,” said Schafer. “Every dollar counts. When we all give, we come together as one community, making Nebraska stronger.”

To donate, apply for aid, or access other disaster assistance resources, visit www.nefb.org/disaster.