Tag Archives: Farming

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Farmer Jeff Jorgenson looks out over 750 acres of cropland submerged beneath the swollen Missouri River, and he knows he probably won’t plant this year.

But that’s not his biggest worry. He and other farmers have worked until midnight for days to move grain, equipment and fuel barrels away from the floodwaters fed by heavy rain and snowmelt. The rising water that has damaged hundreds of homes and been blamed for three deaths has also taken a heavy toll on agriculture, inundating thousands of acres, threatening stockpiled grain and killing livestock.

In Fremont County alone, Jorgenson estimates that more than a million bushels of corn and nearly half a million bushels of soybeans have been lost after water overwhelmed grain bins before they could be emptied of last year’s crop. His calculation using local grain prices puts the financial loss at more than $7 million in grain alone. That’s for about 28 farmers in his immediate area, he said.

Once it’s deposited in bins, grain is not insured, so it’s just lost money. This year farmers have stored much more grain than normal because of a large crop last year and fewer markets in which to sell soybeans because of a trade dispute with China.

“The economy in agriculture is not very good right now. It will end some of these folks farming, family legacies, family farms,” he said. “There will be farmers that will be dealing with so much of a negative they won’t be able to tolerate it.”

Jorgenson, 43, who has farmed since 1998, reached out to friends Saturday, and they helped him move his grain out of bins to an elevator. Had they not acted, he would have lost $135,000.

Vice President Mike Pence surveyed flooded areas in Nebraska Tuesday, where he viewed the raging Elkhorn river, talked to first responders and visited a shelter for displaced people. He promised expedited action on presidential disaster declarations for Iowa and Nebraska.

“We’re going to make sure that federal resources are there for you,” Pence told volunteers at Waterloo, a town of less than 1,000 residents about 21 miles (34 kilometers) west of Omaha that was virtually cut off by the floodwaters.

(Video) On Tuesday, Vice President Mike Pence flew into Nebraska to assess flood damage and emergency response efforts.

The flooding is expected to continue throughout the week in several states as high water flows down the Missouri River. Swollen rivers have already breached more than a dozen levees in Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri, according to the Army Corps of Engineers.

The flooding, which started after a massive late-winter storm last week, has also put some hog farms in southwest Iowa underwater. The dead animals inside must be disposed of, Reynolds said.

The water rose so quickly that farmers in many areas had no time to get animals out, said Chad Hart, an agricultural economist at Iowa State University.

“Places that haven’t seen animal loss have seen a lot of animal stress. That means they’re not gaining weight and won’t be marketed in as timely a manner, which results in additional cost,” he said.

In all, Nebraska Farm Bureau President Steve Nelson estimated $400 million of crop losses from fields left unplanted or planted late and up to $500 million in livestock losses.

In a news release issued Tuesday, Gov. Pete Ricketts said there have been deadlier disasters in Nebraska but never one as widespread. He said 65 of the state’s 93 counties are under emergency declarations.

In neighboring Missouri, water was just shy of getting into Ryonee McCann’s home along a recreational lake in Holt County, where about 40,000 acres (16,188 hectares) and hundreds of homes have been flooded. She said her home sits on an 8-foot (2.5-meter) foundation.

“We have no control over it,” the 38-year-old said. “We just have to wait for the water to recede. It’s upsetting because everything you have worked for is there.”

The Missouri River was forecast to crest Thursday morning at 11.6 feet above flood stage in St. Joseph, Missouri, the third highest crest on record. More than 100 roads are closed in the state, including a growing section of Interstate 29.

Leaders of the small northwestern Missouri town of Craig ordered an evacuation. The Holt County Sheriff’s Department said residents who choose to stay must go to City Hall to provide their name and address in case they need to be rescued.

In nearby Atchison County, Missouri, floodwaters knocked out a larger section of an already busted levee overnight, making the village of Watson unreachable, said Mark Manchester, the county’s deputy director of emergency management/911.

Officials believe everyone got out before thousands of more acres were flooded. But so many roads are now closed that some residents must travel more than 100 miles (160 kilometers) out of their way to get to their jobs at the Cooper Nuclear Station in Nebraska, he said.

“It’s a lot harder for people to get around,” Manchester said.

River flooding has also surrounded a northern Illinois neighborhood with water, prompting residents to escape in boats. People living in the Illinois village of Roscoe say children have walked through floodwaters or kayaked to catch school buses.

Flooding along rivers in western Michigan has damaged dozens of homes and businesses.

LINCOLN, NEB. – The Nebraska Farm Bureau has launched relief efforts to aid Nebraska farmers, ranchers, and rural communities suffering from the natural disasters that have impacted the state. The relief efforts include the establishment of a disaster relief fund and launch of an online agriculture disaster exchange portal to connect those in need with those who can help.

“Nebraska is a special place with special people. Many of our friends and neighbors across the state are suffering. Our thoughts and prayers are with those who have lost or are missing loved ones, and to all those who have been impacted by the recent blizzard and massive flooding events,” said Steve Nelson, Nebraska Farm Bureau president. “We want to do what we can to help. We believe our relief fund and information exchange can be of assistance.”

Money donated to the Disaster Relief Fund will be targeted to aid Nebraska farmers, ranchers, and rural communities affected by recent storms and flooding. Priority will be given to efforts to restore health and safety in rural communities and to farm and ranch households that have been damaged or displaced by the natural disaster.

“The fund’s targeted recipients are farm and ranch families and rural communities in the disaster areas who have immediate needs as a result of the natural disaster, those who cannot get assistance from other sources, those who will have to wait until they receive other assistance, and those who have losses not covered by insurance,” said Nelson.

To aid farmers and ranchers in recovery, the Nebraska Farm Bureau has also opened the Agriculture Disaster Exchange portal. The online portal housed on the Nebraska Farm Bureau website allows members to share information, providing a place for those in need to make requests for assistance and for those looking to help, to offer it.

“The Agriculture Disaster Exchange operates like an online ‘want ad’ page. If a member has extra hay to sell or donate to a livestock producer in need, they can post it there. If a member needs help or equipment to remove debris after flooding, they can post that type of request as well. Those are just examples of how the exchange can be used by our members. The goal is to provide an online clearinghouse so members can interact and help each other during tough times,” said Nelson.

To donate or apply for aid from the Disaster Relief Fund, utilize the Agriculture Disaster Exchange portal, or access other disaster assistance resources, visit www.nefb.org/disaster.

Donations will be made to a fund established in the Nebraska Farm Bureau Foundation, which is a 501(c)(3) charitable nonprofit. Any donations made to the fund are tax-deductible.

David Merrell from St. Edward Nebraska talks about the need for E15 year round in the United States.


Dave Warner from Albion Nebraska talks on the USMCA & its effects on Nebraska agriculture.


Image result for lynn crisp ncga president

2019 NCGA President Lynn Crisp
CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE PODCAST


Andy Groskopf talks about attending his first Classic & his role on the Corn Board


Ted Schrock who is a NCGA Delegate talks about GMO’s & E15


Brandon Hunnicutt talks about the importance of Commodity Classic.


Dan Wesely – President of the Nebraska Corn Growers Association talks about new uses at Commodity Classic.


Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue talks about having all aspects of Ag getting along.

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The Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health (CS-CASH), an agricultural safety and health center in the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public Health, recently awarded five pilot program grants. Two of the recipients are UNMC investigators.

 

CS-CASH receives funding from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

 

Investigators funded and their research projects included:

·                     Bethany Lowndes, Ph.D., assistant professor, UNMC neurological sciences: “Parkinson’s Care for Nebraskans in Agriculture.” 

·                     Carey Wheelhouse, director of clinical assessment/assistant professor, UNMC Division of Physician Assistant Education: “Improving Agricultural Worker Health and Safety Awareness through Multimodal, Case-Based Physician Assistant Education.”

·                     Christine Chasek, associate professor, addiction counseling certificate coordinator, University of Nebraska at Kearney: “Investigating Opioid and Alcohol Risk and Misuse among Rural Agricultural Workers.”

·                     Missy Berry, Ph.D. candidate, North Dakota State University: “Investigation into the Respiratory Properties of Snow Molds.”

·                     Katherine Schofield, Ph.D., assistant professor, mechanical and industrial engineering, University of Minnesota, Duluth: “Injury Prevention in Greenhouse and Nursery Workers through Engineering Design Innovation.”

 

CS-CASH was able to provide a total of $100,000 in funding for the five projects through a partnership between UNMC’s Vice Chancellor of Research, Jennifer Larsen, M.D., and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Office of Research and Economic Development.

 

This program supports project investigators with awards up to $20,000 over an 18-month period. The program goal is to enable investigators to collect preliminary data to support submission of grant applications for independent, longer-term, projects related to agricultural safety and health.

 

The projects selected for support by this program must address a critical issue in agricultural safety and health and lead to a more extensive study of the issue.

 

The Pilot Projects Program has been an essential component of CS-CASH since the center was established in 2011. In addition to NIOSH funding, funding from UNMC’s Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research has allowed CS-CASH to fund 45 pilot projects from 2011 through 2018.

 

Data from pilot projects have been used to generate more than $8 million in additional funding related to agricultural safety and health. Programs and curriculum developed as part of this program have impacted farmers and ranchers, their families, and communities.

 

Applications for the next round of research awards will be in May. Contact ellen.duysen@unmc.edu for information on the application process.

HUTCHINSON, Kan. (AP) — The Kansas Department of Agriculture is accepting applications from farmers who want to be part of the state’s industrial hemp research program, which state lawmakers created last April.

One of the farmers eager to get on board is PJ Sneed, who is building infrastructure, clearing land and establishing a cover crop on his land in western Reno County.

“I’m very excited; for me, it’s been a long time coming,” Sneed said. “It has for a lot of people, especially the grassroots movement. We’ve all been waiting for this moment.”

Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer signed legislation last April to allow industrial hemp production only for research purposes, with a goal of encouraging the resurgence of hemp as a production crop and to promote economic development. The 2018 federal farm bill also legalized hemp farming.

The agriculture department has spent the last year gathering public input and establishing regulations for the program. Applications are due to the department by March 1.

Before the federal farm bill was approved, Kansas could only establish a research program for hemp growing but the state is now open to establishing commercial growing if the legislature approves, The Hutchinson News reported .

“So nothing is changing yet. The law that passed last spring and the regulations that go with it are what’s on the books,” agriculture department spokeswoman Heather Lansdowne said.

Lansdowne said the earliest the state could have additional laws to allow industrial hemp would likely be 2020.

Sneed agreed and predicted a large increase in hemp growers in the new future.

“I think in year two you’ll see a huge boom after people see what it is and how it’s grown,” he said. “In 2020 I think you’ll start to see more banks open up for commercial loans and things like that.”

The application process will include background checks and more.

The Hemp Biz Conference and the Planted Association of Kansas, of which Sneed is a member, will host a symposium on hemp growing in Hutchinson on Feb. 23. He said it’s designed to help farmers network and find markets but the focus this year will be on rules and regulations and the application process.