Tag Archives: NCBA

The 2019 Cattle Industry Summer Business Meeting wrapped up today with a meeting of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association’s Board of Directors. The meeting kicked off on Monday at the Gaylord Rockies Resort and Convention Center just outside Denver.

“I want to thank the hundreds of producers, state affiliates, and partners who took valuable time out of their busy schedules to help chart a better future for our entire industry,” said NCBA President Jennifer Houston. “The decisions made this week will affect our industry’s marketing and policy priorities for years to come.”

NCBA’s policy committees met throughout the week to refine positions on public policy issues like international trade, access to public lands, dietary guidelines, and the marketing of fake meat. Producers also received updates on how their checkoff dollars are being invested to fund vital research and marketing efforts.

Attendees also heard from Randy Blach of Cattlefax in a standing-room-only General Session keynote address about what lies ahead for cattle markets. Seven cattle operations were also named regional finalists for the Environmental Stewardship Award Program (ESAP). This year’s regional winners will compete for the national award, which will be announced during the Annual Cattle Industry Convention in San Antonio, Texas, in February 2020.

This year’s meeting also saw the rollout of a new NCBA podcast, Cattlemen’s Call, which focuses on the people who make up the beef industry. The podcast is hosted by ag broadcaster Lane Nordlund and can be accessed at https://www.ncba.org/CattlemensCall.aspx.

Blew Partnership of Castleton, Kan., has been selected as one of seven regional finalists for the Environmental Stewardship Award Program (ESAP). The award, announced during the 2019 Cattle Industry Summer Business Meeting July 30, recognizes the operation’s outstanding stewardship and conservation efforts. This year’s regional winners will compete for the national award, which will be announced during the 2020 Annual Cattle Industry Convention in San Antonio, Texas, in February.
Established in 1991 by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association to recognize outstanding land stewards in the cattle industry, ESAP is generously sponsored by Corteva Agriscience, McDonald’s, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Cattlemen’s Foundation.
“America’s cattle producers are the original stewards of the land. They rely on a healthy ecosystem, including land, air and water resources, for their livelihood and they understand better than anyone the benefits of caring for those resources,” said NCBA President Jennifer Houston. “The lands we manage as farmers and ranchers are only entrusted to us for a short time and farmers and ranchers across the nation are committed to passing those resources to the next generation in a manner which ensures their future success. This year’s ESAP nominees Award Program exemplify the greatness of our industry and they share a common the common goal of bettering our industry through outstanding stewardship practices.”
The Blew Partnership has been in the Blew family for five generations. Brothers CJ and Russell run the cow-calf operation, which stretches across 19,000 acres. The Blew family leases about 95 percent of their lands in three counties: Reno, Chase and Barber.
The brothers like the challenge of taking land from a dire state to healthy again. Their Barber County ranch was purchased in 2012, which at that time had between 23 and 40 percent canopy of Eastern Red Cedar.
“At the end of the day we really are in the land rehabilitation business,” said CJ. “We couldn’t have the cows without the land resource. The cows are a tool for us to help improve it.”
The Barber County ranch faced devastation in 2016 when a multi-state wildfire burned through the land. With devastation came blessings; the fire helped restore native grasses, improve soils and accelerate the timetable for reducing Eastern Red Cedar. Streams that had dried up began flowing again. The Blews partnered with the National Resources Conservation Service to add miles of cross fencing to support their intensive rotational grazing plan and install an extensive water distribution system throughout the ranch.
“The water systems have definitely helped us to graze a greater herd size and increase stock density, thereby improving grazing distribution,” said Russell.
“The grass has improved tremendously,” said Dusty Tacha, Rangeland Management Specialist for USDA-NRCS. “A lot of that is due to obtaining an animal forage balance.”
The Blews work with neighbors and are leaders in their prescribed burn associations. They use fire as a natural resource to improve range land and stay on top of the invasive Red Cedar. Controlled burns allow the grasses and stocking density to improve.
“We deal with vast tracts of land in Barber County, burning two and three thousand acres at a time, which necessitates vast equipment and vast personnel,” said Russell. “We can control a 3 to 4,000-acre fire without any issues.”
In Reno County, the Blew Partnership has moved away from grain production and worked with the Cheney Lake Watershed Task Force to fund the conversion of more than 1,500 crop acres back to perennial grasses and cover crops. As commodity prices went down, it prompted an easy transition to a grazing crop harvested by cattle.
The Blews continue to build a family tradition of improving their cattle and land, whether irrigated pasture or native range. The brothers keep a long-term approach when it comes to management because they know the decisions made each morning will affect the longevity of their operation.
“We definitely manage our cow herd and our land resource with the idea that it’s going to the next generation,” said Russell. “Sustainability is a huge part of that. We want to manage for the next 50 years and not the next five months.”

Denver, CO– Herd expansion, export markets, corn crop expectations and swine fever ramifications are among the factors that will have an impact on the upcoming U.S. cattle market, Randy Blach, CEO of CattleFax, told more than 700 attendees of the 2019 Cattle Industry Summer Business Meeting near Denver July 30, 2019. Blach was keynote speaker at the Opening General Session of the meeting, a gathering for leaders of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Cattlemen’s Beef Board, American National CattleWomen and National Cattlemen’s Foundation.

Blach told the group that U.S. cattle herd expansion had slowed to a crawl, with the lion’s share of growth behind the industry. That slowing had been expected, he said. Record beef, pork and poultry supplies are having an impact on the market. For that reason and with record meat consumption expected next year, it’s critical for export markets to be opened and trade policy questions to be answered, he said.

However, consumers have responded well to the increased quality of beef production in this country, Blach said. There has been a 50 percent increase in prime and choice production over the past 15 years, and 80 percent of U.S. beef is now Prime and Choice. Beef has captured an additional 7 percent of market share of meat spending from poultry and pork. “It’s a great, great success story,” Blach said. “We have to continue to be the highest quality protein provider, delivering products we can stand behind that consumers love.”

Blach pointed out that the average consumer works only 12 minutes to be able to pay for one pound of high quality Choice beef. “That’s a bargain,” he said.

Corn crop uncertainty centered around the number of acres planted and yield potential is also of concern, as the impact of wet weather in grain producing segments of the country will be unknown until the middle of August, Blach said. Furthermore, ramifications of swine fever in China will add some unknowns to the equation. “We’re looking at a lot of volatility as a result of what’s happening in that part of the world,” he said.

“We have to remember that only 4 percent of the world’s consumers live in this country,” Blach added. “Currently 14 percent of beef and beef by products are exported. More than 20 percent of the value of every fed steer is generated by exports. We need to have more outlets for not only our beef, but our poultry and pork.”

Blach said that while an economic recession could have some serious repercussions on the beef cattle industry, the bottom line for producers is profitability, which in general the industry has seen in recent history. “If we’re not profitable, we’re not sustainable,” he said. “I do believe we’re going to stay profitable as we go through this cycle.”

Blach’s comments reflected information shared with CattleFax members in a Long Term Outlook produced last week. The Outlook provides an up-to-date look at the factors influencing the U.S. cattle market and its producers.

The Summer Business Meeting gives industry leaders a chance to meet and discuss the direction of programs for 2020. Beef Checkoff committees made up of members of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board and directors on the NCBA Federation Division meet to assess authorization requests submitted by checkoff contractors, submitting their suggestions to the Beef Promotion Operating Committee, which meets in September. The BPOC will develop a plan and budget and submit its recommendation to the full Beef Board for authorization. The 2020 program must be approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture before it can begin Oct. 1, 2019.

Meanwhile, NCBA policy committees meet to develop a game plan for the organization’s efforts to support and protect the U.S. cattle industry in Washington, D.C. and across the country beginning in January of 2020. These include livestock marketing; federal lands; agriculture and food policy; cattle health and well-being; property rights and environmental management and international trade.

With the beef industry going through continuous changes and advancements, it is important cattlemen and women across the country are “in the know”, which is where the Cattlemen’s Education Series (CES) comes into play. This partnership between the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association(NCBA) is designed to provide resources to NCBA state and breed affiliates through a grant which allows them to extend outstanding educational experiences locally. The mission of the CES is to provide cutting-edge information to beef producers that contributes to increased knowledge, profitability and sustainability.

 

With approximately 32 percent of the Nation’s 2018 corn crop being utilized as animal feed, this partnership is important as it promotes corn products and by-products utilized in the cattle industry.

 

“I understand the importance of being able to deliver a quality product for my customers,” said Missouri farmer Gary Porter. “I take pride knowing the crop I grow will end up in so many outlets.”

 

Porter also serves as the liaison to the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association for the National Corn Growers Association. “Our ability to produce an abundant and high-quality crop, makes corn an attractive feedstock for current and future end users.”

 

The recent advances in corn fractionation technology, provides the opportunity for more tailored, species specific distillers feed products, in addition to the great value that present DDGS bring today.

 

“As a cattle producer, I have confidence in the U.S. corn crop and the value that corn and DDGS bring to my cattle and operation,” said NCBA Vice President Jerry Bohn. “It is good to see the various partnerships from NCGA and the state corn affiliates to increase beef demand, especially exports through USMEF. NCGA also shows their commitment to cattlemen via the Cattlemen Education Series grant program that supports cutting edge education for beef producers that contributes to their increased knowledge, profitability and sustainability.”

 

Although the NCGA funded grant program is still young, NCBA has awarded over forty CES grants across the country. Look for upcoming CES events in your area.

Centennial, CO  —    Thanks to an investment from the Federation of State Beef Councils, an upcoming episode of a popular Fox network food show will feature Beef Checkoff-funded Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. 

As part of its biggest and toughest season yet, MasterChef Season 10 has partnered with the Beef Checkoff to bring viewers the beefiest Backyard BBQ challenge. Tune in to Fox on Thursday, July 18 at 8/7c to see how chefs use various popular beef cuts in the challenge.

 

Featuring Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. on MasterChef, one of television’s most popular cooking shows, is a sure way to put beef on the forefront to millions of consumers throughout the country. When consumers are able to see easy, fun and enticing ways to incorporate beef into their next meal, they are more likely to purchase beef on their next trip to the grocery store. Being a part of this show is just one way the Beef Checkoff is dedicated to promoting beef to consumers through innovative and creative avenues.

 

On Friday, July 19, visit BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com to see the winning recipe, learn more about the cuts featured on the show and see other MasterChef-inspired recipes being promoted to consumers for them to share with their family and friends at their own backyard BBQs.

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) today sent a letter signed by 39 of its state affiliates to U.S. Senate and House leaders urging them to support the swift ratification of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).

The letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy is NCBA’s latest salvo in the battle to build support for USMCA ratification, coming less than two weeks after the group launched a new media campaign to push the accord.

“American cattle producers need to maintain our unrestricted, duty-free access to markets in Canada and Mexico, and that’s exactly what USMCA would guarantee us,” said NCBA President Jennifer Houston. “Jeopardizing that access by having Congress not take action on USMCA is simply not an option for us.”

In addition to calling on Congress to quickly ratify USMCA, the letter also encouraged the Capitol Hill leaders to oppose efforts to re-instate failed policies of the past, such as mandatory country-of-origin labeling, or MCOOL.

“MCOOL was U.S. law for six years until it was repealed by Congress in 2015 to avoid $1 billion of retaliatory tariffs from Canada and Mexico that were sanctioned by the World Trade Organization (WTO),” the letter says. “The truth is MCOOL cost the U.S. beef industry hundreds of millions of dollars to implement, and the vast majority of consumers never paid attention to it. Our industry has suffered enough with this bad idea and we do not need to relive the sins of the past.”

Click here to read the full letter, and click here to view NCBA’s “Faces of USMCA” media campaign, which launched in June.