Tag Archives: wheat

The nation’s row-crop harvest and winter wheat planting progress slowed last week, USDA’s National Ag Statistics Service said in its weekly Crop Progress report on Tuesday. The report is normally released on Mondays but was delayed this week due to Veterans Day.

Listen to Clay Patton with the report here: https://post.futurimedia.com/krvnam/playlist/crop-progress-report-1113-5473.html

As of Sunday, Nov. 11, 88% of the nation’s soybeans were harvested, up just 5 percentage points from the previous week. That was 5 percentage points behind the five-year average of 93%.

States with a significant amount of the soybean crop still in the field included Missouri with 30% of its soybeans still unharvested, Kansas with 26% of its crop unharvested and Arkansas with 22% of its soybeans still in the field, noted DTN Analyst Todd Hultman.

Corn harvest ended the week at 84% complete, up 8 percentage points from the previous week. Harvest lagged last year by 3 percentage points and was 3 percentage points behind the five-year average of 87%. Seventeen percent of the crop was still unharvested in Iowa, and 23% of Nebraska’s corn was still in the field, Hultman noted.

Winter wheat progress also remained behind normal last week. Eighty-nine percent of the crop was planted as of Sunday, behind last year’s 94% and also behind the five-year average of 94%. Winter wheat emerged, at 77%, was behind both last year’s pace of 83% and the average pace of 83%.

“Winter wheat planting reached 90% in Kansas, but is only 65% in Arkansas and 72% in Missouri,” Hultman said.

NASS estimated 54% of the nation’s winter wheat was in good-to-excellent condition, up 3 percentage points from 51% the previous week.

Seventy-three percent of the sorghum crop was harvested as of Sunday, behind 81% last year and 11 percentage points behind the five-year average of 84%.

Ninety-six percent of cotton had bolls opening as of Sunday, behind the average of 98%. Fifty-four percent of cotton was harvested, behind last year’s 63% and also behind the average pace of 61%. NASS has stopped reporting the condition of the cotton crop this season.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/…. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Harvested 84 76 81 87
Soybeans Harvested 88 83 93 93
Winter Wheat Planted 89 84 94 94
Winter Wheat Emerged 77 70 83 83
Cotton Bolls Opening 96 94 98 98
Cotton Harvested 54 49 63 61
Sorghum Harvested 73 64 81 84

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP=Very Poor; P=Poor; F=Fair; G=Good; E=Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Winter Wheat 3 9 34 45 9 3 9 37 42 9 3 8 35 46 8

MANHATTAN, Kan. — The phrase heard around the agriculture world is “tell your story.” Today most Americans are three generations removed from the farm so tales from the tractor are more important now than ever. Wheat farmers saw this need, and their conduit of conversation, EatWheat.org, is celebrating its first year of operation.

EatWheat allows the wheat industry to speak with one voice in an effort to reclaim the national conversation on wheat and share one primary message amongst numerous influencers while we dismantle the false promises of wheatless diets.

When urban consumers look down at their plate, many don’t know how that food came from the farm to their table. While it may not be a topic of constant thought, many have begun to wonder about the farmers who produce the food they consume and the processes used to create such a bounty.

Kansas wheat farmers are the driving force behind the EatWheat.org campaign, which aims to create awareness of farm and production practices through the lens of food as identity. And the food that we think can connect best is, of course, wheat. It’s simple. It’s versatile. It’s natural. And it doesn’t matter if it’s homemade for hours, or picked up at the grocery store ready-to-go – it’s a simple and natural way to connect to others and yourself.

After a year of operation, the good news is that the conversation is working. EatWheat’s Facebook follower count now ranks in the thousands and Instagram is ever-growing. Videos produced sharing the story of American agriculture have garnered tens-of-thousands of views. Fast-paced videos showing quick-and-easy wheat-based recipes have amassed more than 70,000 views on Facebook alone. But the real value in the social media world is the conversations that have been had with consumers who simply want to know where their food comes from.

During wheat harvest, nine food bloggers visited a Kansas wheat farm, flour mill and the Kansas Wheat Innovation Center. They baked with fellow blogger and popular cookbook author Zoë François of Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day. These bloggers shared their experiences learning about wheat on their blogs and with their 5.4 million social media followers.

More than 120,000 visitors have made their way to EatWheat.org during its inaugural year. These viewers typically come to the website to grab some quick-and-easy recipes, but they stay to learn more about where their food comes from.

EatWheat’s standout traffic performer this first year was Pinterest. The popular Pinterest account has garnered around 3 million views per month on the wheat-based ideas shared on our feed. This totals more than 30 million pairs of eyes on wheat recipes in the last 10 months alone. While not every pin shared on the account comes from EatWheat.org, every pin is wheat related. Every carb-tastic idea seen means that fewer fad diet ideas are shown, which leads to consumers rediscovering wheat in their family’s diets.

Now is the time to have these conversations with consumers. Wheat food consumption is on the rise for the first time in several years. In 2017 wheat for food use rose 14 million bushels over the previous year and flour consumption rose slightly to 131.8 pounds from 131.7 pounds per capita.

If you’re interested in learning more about the EatWheat project, please visit EatWheat.org and amplify these messages by sharing social media posts at facebook.com/eatwheat.orginstagram.com/eatwheat/ and pinterest.com/eatwheatorg/.

As you are making your end of the year tax plans, we ask you to consider making a tax-deductible donation of cash to the Kansas Wheat Commission Research Foundation to further wheat research efforts at the Kansas Wheat Innovation Center. Or better yet, how about donating an acre of wheat, or a truckload of wheat, to the KWCRF?

 

All donations are used to further the mission of Kansas State University’s wheat breeding program, ensuring that Kansas farmers have access to the best possible wheat varieties and that scientists can leverage human, financial and laboratory resources to make significant improvements to wheat genetics.

 

The Kansas Wheat Commission Research Foundation differs from the wheat checkoff. The checkoff does fund wheat research, but it also is used for marketing, promotion and education. Donations to the Kansas Wheat Commission Research Foundation will be used only for wheat research, and only at Kansas State University.

 

The end of the year is a great time to donate wheat to the KWC Research Foundation. For many cash basis farmers, significant tax savings can be achieved by donating crops grown directly to a charitable organization. Cash charitable contributions are deductible only as an itemized deduction from adjusted gross income which results in reducing federal income tax only. By contributing crops to a charitable organization a farmer can avoid including the sale of the cash crop in income and can still deduct the cost of growing the crop, which results in saving self-employment tax, federal income tax and state income tax.

 

A farmer can give a grain “donation” by giving up ownership of the grain. A gift should be made from unsold crop inventory, with no prior sale commitment made prior to the gift. A farmer will gift the grain to the charitable organization and let them decide what to do with it and when to sell it. A letter to the charitable organization summarizing the source of the gift from the farmer and an acknowledgement of the gift by the charitable organization should be kept on file. This may be needed to serve as a substitute for a sales receipt in the yield verification process at FSA offices (and crop insurance) on the quantity of gifted grain, since the grain sales documents would not be in the name of the farmer, but rather in the name of the charitable organization.

 

Depending upon the size of your gift, a number of donor recognition opportunities exist. All will be displayed in the Kansas Wheat Innovation Center, so that you, your children and grandchildren will see that your gift played a major role in shaping the bright future of Kansas wheat production.

The nation’s soybean harvest picked up speed last week, while the percentage of corn harvested ended the week equal to the five-year average, USDA’s National Ag Statistics Service said in its weekly Crop Progress report on Monday.

As of Sunday, Oct. 28, 72% of the nation’s soybeans were harvested, up 19 percentage points from the previous week but still 9 percentage points behind the five-year average of 81%. That was an improvement from the previous week when harvest lagged the average pace by 16 points.

“Judging by the slower pace of harvest, several states appear to have troubled areas, including Iowa, Kansas, Arkansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Wisconsin and the Dakotas,” said DTN Analyst Todd Hultman. “Soybean crop quality remains a concern in late 2018.”

Corn harvest ended the week at 63% complete, up 14 percentage points from the previous week but equal to the five-year average of 63%. That compares to the previous week when harvest was 2 percentage points ahead of normal.

“Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin, Missouri and Ohio are above their five-year average paces,” Hultman said. “Iowa, Nebraska and the Dakotas are below their five-year paces with Iowa corn 49% harvested.”

NASS is no longer reporting condition ratings for corn and soybeans for the 2018 growing season.

Meanwhile, winter wheat planting was 78% complete as of Sunday, behind 83% last year at the same time and also behind the five-year average of 85%. Winter wheat emerged, at 63%, was equal to last year’s pace but behind the average pace of 67%.

“Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas remain below their usual planting paces at 76%, 78% and 67% planted, respectively,” Hultman said. “Nebraska, Colorado and South Dakota are all in the mid-90s, nearly finished.”

NASS reported winter wheat condition for the 2019 crop for the first time on Monday, estimating 53% of wheat nationwide in good-to-excellent condition. That’s 1 percentage point above last year’s rating at the same time of 52% good to excellent.

Fifty-three percent of the sorghum crop was harvested as of Sunday, behind 57% last year and 13 percentage points behind the five-year average of 66%.

Ninety-six percent of rice was harvested as of Sunday, behind last year’s 99% and also behind the five-year average of 98%.

Ninety-one percent of cotton had bolls opening as of Sunday, behind the average of 94%. Forty-four percent of cotton was harvested, near last year’s 45% and also near of the average pace of 43%.

Cotton condition improved slightly from 34% good to excellent the previous week to 35% last week.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/…. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Harvested 63 49 52 63
Soybeans Harvested 72 53 81 81
Winter Wheat Planted 78 72 83 85
Winter Wheat Emerged 63 53 63 67
Cotton Bolls Opening 91 88 92 94
Cotton Harvested 44 39 45 43
Sorghum Mature 94 89 95 95
Sorghum Harvested 53 46 57 66
Rice Harvested 96 90 99 98

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP=Very Poor; P=Poor; F=Fair; G=Good; E=Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Cotton 18 16 31 27 8 13 20 33 26 8 5 10 30 41 14
Winter Wheat 3 11 33 45 8 NA NA NA NA NA 4 8 36 43 9

 More than a foot of rain fell on the Ted Guetterman farm in Johnson County during a three-day stretch from Oct. 5-7. At roughly the same time, nearly four inches of rain fell on the Roger Glenn family farm in Finney County, approximately 365 miles west.
The Guetterman family walked around in water standing atop their no-till fields and the Glenns were slip-sliding away on their no-till land. Combines chomping at the bit to harvest the bountiful corn, bean and milo crops sat dead still.
It would be two weeks before the machines would move and that depended on no additional moisture. Kansas grain farmers waited on pins and needles from the eastern border of Kansas to the Colorado border hoping for sunshine and dry weather.
Glenn, who’s farmed with his father-in-law for 32 years can’t remember a fall so wet. Fortunately, he’d harvested some of his corn crop and sowed his winter wheat crop. Only one bin full of milo came out of his fields before the deluge during the first week of October.
Rainfall on the family farm in Finney and Kearny counties sprawls 25 miles from one end to the other. Moisture ranged from 2.6-3.8 inches during this rain event.
“We try to keep a rain gauge on every quarter of land,” Glenn says. “This allows us to check actual rainfalls and remains the most accurate method of charting rainfall so we can determine what crop to plant on every field.”
An October rainfall of this magnitude results in excellent crops for the winter wheat and next year’s corn and milo planted in the spring of 2019. Water stands in some of the low spots throughout their land. Some grader ditches stood nearly full and while others were at least half full.
While checking his fields after the three-day rain, Glenn probed several of the family quarter sections and punched his six-foot probe within four inches of the end of the steel rod.
“Every once in a while, we’re blessed with a full profile of moisture in our fields during the spring, but not like this in the fall,” Glenn says. “We finished drilling our wheat two days before the rain came and the new crop has emerged and looks really good – thick, green and lush. This new crop will really pop once the sun comes out and we have some more fall-like days.”
The early October rains made sure Glenn could drill his winter wheat within an inch from the top of the soil and residue. He says this newly-planted crop has the potential to be one of their best stands in a long while.
While the milo crop itself is dry and ready to cut, the leaf canopy will shade the ground and push harvest several days into the future. Glenn can’t wait to begin milo harvest.
“Two years ago, we cut one of our best milo crops ever,” the southwestern Kansas farmer says. “This year our milo looks like the best we’ve ever grown. The heads are big and full and while we don’t like to predict what a crop will make, we’re hoping for better than 100 bushels to the acre and some may make 130 bushels.”
Once the fall harvest begins again, it will no doubt take more time. Fields are saturated with water and trucks and grain carts will be kept out of the fields to prevent compaction and tearing up the soil.
“Anytime we receive rain in October, we’re happy for it,” Glenn says. “It may be Thanksgiving before we finish, or even later if it keeps raining. We’ve been faced with harvest delays before and we’ll finish up when we’re finished.”

The nation’s soybean harvest fell further behind the normal pace last week, and corn harvest also slowed to just a couple points ahead of average, USDA’s National Ag Statistics Service said in its weekly Crop Progress report on Monday.

As of Sunday, Oct. 21, 53% of the soybean crop was harvested, 16 points behind the five-year average of 69%. That’s slightly further behind average than the previous week when harvest stood at 15 points behind the five-year average.

“Illinois and Indiana are the only major producers ahead of their five-year average pace,” said DTN Analyst Todd Hultman. “Iowa’s soybeans are only 37% harvested versus a five-year average of 71% for this time of year.”

Despite concerns about the quality of the crop in some parts of the country, NASS left its good-to-excellent condition rating for soybeans unchanged at 68% last week.

Corn harvest also slowed again last week. At 49% complete, harvest was only 2 percentage points ahead of the average pace of 47%. That was nearer to normal than the previous week when harvest was 4 percentage points ahead of the five-year average.

Corn condition also held steady nationwide last week at 68% good to excellent.

Winter wheat planting was 72% complete as of Sunday, near 73% last year at the same time but behind the five-year average of 77%. Winter wheat emerged, at 53%, was ahead of last year’s 50% but slightly behind the average pace of 55%.

“Not much progress was made in Texas, Oklahoma or Kansas where wheat plantings are 63%, 75% and 67%, respectively,” Hultman said.

Forty-six percent of the sorghum crop was harvested as of Sunday, up just 4 percentage points from the previous week, equal to last year and 10 percentage points behind the five-year average of 56%.

Ninety percent of rice was harvested as of Sunday, behind last year’s 97% and also behind the five-year average of 94%.

Eighty-eight percent of cotton had bolls opening as of Sunday, near the average of 89%. Thirty-nine percent of cotton was harvested, ahead of last year’s 36% and also ahead of the average pace of 33%.

Cotton condition fell again slightly from 35% good to excellent the previous week to 34% last week.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Harvested 49 39 37 47
Soybeans Harvested 53 38 67 69
Winter Wheat Planted 72 65 73 77
Winter Wheat Emerged 53 44 50 55
Cotton Bolls Opening 88 85 86 89
Cotton Harvested 39 32 36 33
Sorghum Mature 89 81 88 89
Sorghum Harvested 46 42 46 56
Rice Harvested 90 88 97 94

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP=Very Poor; P=Poor; F=Fair; G=Good; E=Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 4 8 20 48 20 4 8 20 47 21 3 8 23 50 16
Soybeans 3 8 23 48 18 3 8 23 48 18 3 9 27 48 13
Sorghum 6 12 29 43 10 6 11 28 44 11 2 6 27 52 13
Cotton 13 20 33 26 8 11 20 34 29 6 5 9 30 42 14

Timely and adequate moisture through the soft white (SW) and white club (WC) growing season and a transition to a warm, dry harvest helped Pacific Northwest (PNW) farmers produce high-quality crops that will provide an excellent range of flour for finished products. The high-protein segment of the SW crop also provides opportunities in blends for Asian noodles, steamed breads, flat breads and pan breads.

USDA estimates total 2018 PNW SW production at 6.03 million metric tons (MMT), up slightly from 2017’s 5.64 MMT. Of that, the Washington Grain Commission estimates white club (WC) accounts for 370 metric tons (MT).

Here is a summary of the season and test results, with full data available online soon and in upcoming USW Crop Quality Seminars.

Wheat and Grade Data: The overall average grade of the 2018 SW and WC crops is U.S. No. 1. The average SW test weight of 61.7 lb/bu (81.1 kg/hl) is higher than last year’s 60.9 lb/bu (80.1 kg/hl); WC test weight of 60.4 lb/bu (79.5 kg/hl) is slightly higher than 2017’s 60.2 lb/bu (79.2 kg/hl). With slight variation, SW and WC grade factors are similar to last year and the 5-year averages. Wheat moisture for both SW and WC is below last year and the 5-year averages, reflecting the dry harvest conditions.

The overall SW and WC wheat protein content (12 percent mb) of 9.3 percent and 9.0 percent, respectively, are 0.3 and 0.4 percentage points below the respective 2017 values and well below the wheat protein 5-year averages. SW wheat ash content (14 percent mb) is slightly higher than last year and the 5-year average; WC wheat ash is higher than last year and the 5-year average. Thousand kernel weights for SW and WC are slightly above 2017 and 5-year average levels. Both SW and WC kernel diameters are slightly larger than last year and the 5-year averages. Falling number values are 315 seconds for SW and 316 seconds for WC are both below last year and the 5-year averages.

Flour and Dough Data: The 2018 SW crop Buhler Laboratory Mill flour extraction average of 72.5 percent is lower than last year and the 5-year average; the WC average of 76.9 percent is higher than last year and the 5-year average. Flour protein content (14 percent mb) is 8.3 percent and 8.0 percent for SW and WC, respectively. Flour ash content (14 percent mb) for both SW and WC is slightly higher than last year, but lower than the 5-year averages. Amylograph peak viscosity value for SW is 497 BU, slightly higher than last year and for WC is 415 BU, lower than last year. Starch damage values are slightly higher for SW and WC than last year, but lower than the 5-year averages. SW and WC solvent retention capacity (SRC) water values are similar to last year and the 5-year averages. SW sucrose and sodium carbonate values are similar to last year, but lower than the 5-year average. SW and WC lactic acid values are higher than last year, but lower than the 5-year averages. SW gluten performance index (GPI) is higher than last year and the 5-year average, and WC GPI is slightly lower than last year and the 5-year average. SW and WC farinograph peak and stability times are close to last year’s and the 5-year averages, while water absorption is higher than last year for SW and the same as last year for WC. The SW and WC alveograph L values are considerably longer than last year and the 5-year averages. SW and WC extensograph resistance is similar to last year and higher than the 5-year averages. SW extensibility value is longer than last year and the 5-year average and WC extensibility is similar to last year and shorter than the 5-year average.

Bake Data: Sponge cake volume for SW at 1066 cc is smaller than last year and the 5-year averages, and the total score is slightly higher than last year and the 5-year average. The sponge cake volume for WC at 1115 cc is smaller than last year and the 5-year average, and total score is higher than last year and the 5-year average. SW and WC cookie diameter values are larger than last year and the 5-year averages. SW and WC cookie spread factors are less than last year and the 5-year averages.

Chinese Southern-Type Steamed Bread: Each flour was made into southern-type steamed bread and compared to a control flour. SW specific volume is the same as last year and the 5-year average. WC specific volume is slightly higher than last year, but slightly lower than the 5-year average. The SW and WC total scores are lower than last year and the 5-year averages.

Rain and snow last week pushed the nation’s soybean harvest further behind the average pace and also slowed the corn harvest, USDA’s National Ag Statistics Service said in its weekly Crop Progress report on Monday.

As of Sunday, Oct. 14, 38% of the soybean crop was harvested, up just 6 percentage points from the previous week and 15 points behind the five-year average of 53%. That’s further behind normal than the previous week when harvest lagged the average pace by just 4 percentage points.

 

Listen to the report here: https://post.futurimedia.com/krvnam/playlist/futures-one-crop-progress-report-10-15-5292.html

Though the national average good-to-excellent condition rating for soybeans dropped by only 2 percentage points from 68% the previous week to 66% last week, crop conditions in some key soybean-growing states worsened last week.

The percentage of soybeans rated as very poor to poor in Iowa rose 2 percentage points from 9% the previous week to 11% last week. In North Dakota, soybeans were rated 20% very poor to poor, up 4 percentage points from the previous week. Missouri soybeans’ very-poor-to-poor rating was also up 4 percentage points from 19% the previous week to 23% last week.

The wet conditions last week also slowed the corn harvest. Nationwide, 39% of corn was harvested as of Sunday, still 4 percentage points ahead of the five-year average of 35% but nearer to the average pace than the previous week when harvest was 8 percentage points ahead of normal.

Corn condition held steady nationwide last week at 68% good to excellent.

Winter wheat planting was 65% finished as of Sunday, ahead of 58% last year at the same time but slightly behind the five-year average of 67%. Winter wheat emerged, at 44%, was ahead of last year’s 35% and also ahead of the average pace of 41%.

Forty-two percent of the sorghum crop was harvested as of Sunday, behind the average pace of 48%.

Eighty-eight percent of rice was harvested as of Sunday, behind last year’s 90% but near the five-year average of 87%.

Eighty-five percent of cotton had bolls opening as of Sunday, ahead of the average of 83%. Thirty-two percent of cotton was harvested, slightly ahead of last year’s 30% and also ahead of the average pace of 25%. Nationwide, cotton condition dropped 7 percentage points from 42% good to excellent the previous week to 35% last week.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Mature 96 93 89 91
Corn Harvested 39 34 27 35
Soybeans Dropping Leaves 95 91 93 92
Soybeans Harvested 38 32 47 53
Winter Wheat Planted 65 57 58 67
Winter Wheat Emerged 44 30 35 41
Cotton Bolls Opening 85 78 81 83
Cotton Harvested 32 25 30 25
Sorghum Mature 81 73 79 82
Sorghum Harvested 42 39 39 48
Rice Harvested 88 79 90 87

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP=Very Poor; P=Poor; F=Fair; G=Good; E=Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 4 8 20 47 21 4 8 20 47 21 3 8 24 50 15
Soybeans 3 8 23 48 18 3 7 22 49 19 3 9 27 48 13
Sorghum 6 11 28 44 11 5 11 29 44 11 2 6 27 52 13
Cotton 11 20 34 29 6 6 19 33 32 10 5 8 29 43 15
The Wheat Breeding program at Kansas State University is about more than just developing new wheat varieties for Kansas. While the release of superior varieties is an end goal of the program, many other aspects benefit Kansas farmers. Many of the wheat varieties that are released, from both public and private entities, have pedigrees from K-State varieties.
A few of these benefits include the ability to develop future wheat breeders, perform long-term research and collaborate with a wider scientific community.
K-State has two wheat breeders: Dr. Allan Fritz runs the Manhattan program and develops hard red winter wheat varieties for eastern and central Kansas, and Dr. Guorong Zhang runs the Hays program and develops hard red winter and hard white varieties for central and western Kansas.
The programs are funded by Kansas State University, Kansas Wheat Commission and Kansas Wheat Alliance. The funding from wheat farmers is used for operation of the program, including staff time to plant and harvest in excess of 20,000 yield plots per year, equipment purchases and upkeep, and travel to plots across the state.
Develop Future Breeders
The public breeding program helps to develop the future of wheat breeders for the industry. The program employs graduate students and post-doctoral research assistants, who graduate and go on to work in other public and private breeding programs. These breeders will in turn shape the future of the wheat industry, but their roots will be firmly planted in their training in Kansas.
Long-term Research
New technologies are being used
Development of a new wheat variety is a long-term process. It takes about 12 years from the initial greenhouse cross until that new variety is available to farmers. With new technologies available, that development time is decreasing. These new technologies include high throughput phenotyping, genomic selection, doubled haploids, speed breeding and DNA markers.
“We’re really on the front edge of implementing these things and putting them into the breeding program and learning how to harness their power,” said Fritz.
Sequence of wheat genome
With the recent completion of the sequence of the wheat genome, the industry is on the forefront of additional technological advances. A genome sequence is like a map for wheat researchers. Think about going on a trip with no map. You will probably end up where you wanted to go eventually, but it will require extra time, wrong turns and headaches. The wheat genome sequence allows researchers to have a tool to guide them while experimenting with valuable traits for Kansas wheat farmers at a more rapid pace.
“It gives you some tools to really do some novel things. We’re really at the front edge of having the tools and knowledge to do some very interesting things and potentially revolutionary things with that kind of technology,” said Fritz. “So having these technologies is a part of making sure that we’re really providing the advantages for Kansas producers.”
Wild relatives
Because of the continued long-term investment in the program, breeders are able to work on projects that won’t provide a return on investment in the short term. One of these allows them to bring in the diversity of wild relatives of wheat.
While generations of cross-breeding have led to modern varieties with better yields and disease resistances, this has meant that other valuable traits found in wild wheat relatives have been left on the table. Wheat researchers are now on a treasure hunt to find those traits and breed them back into our modern varieties.
“The genetic diversity that we’re bringing in will benefit all of the wheat community.” Fritz said, “We can take some chances on some things that aren’t entirely appropriate for a private breeding program to do, things that wouldn’t make sense in terms of revenue projects.”
Broader Scientific Community
Another benefit of the public breeding program is the access to so many scientists and researchers and the ability to collaborate with other departments at K-State.  This includes other departments like entomology, plant pathology, agronomy and grain science, just to name a few.
“What’s really cool about being a wheat breeder at K-State is that you have all these resources around you to make your program better,” said Fritz. “The varieties we’re producing are really the product of not just the effort that’s in our program, but there’s all this other research effort that’s going on at K-State as well, that feeds information into that. We’re just really fortunate to have that infrastructure behind us. That’s a lot of the secret to our success.”
With these benefits, it only makes sense that the K-State breeding program only releases varieties that offer an improvement over the other varieties in the marketplace.
Fritz talks about varieties in comparison to a three-legged stool. First, there must be yield potential or farmers won’t grow it. Second, there must be a way to protect that yield through disease resistance, heat tolerance, insect resistance and all of the pieces that go into yield protection. And the final component is quality, which means that the variety will meet the industry standard for baked products.
Fritz says their release philosophy has always been relatively conservative, so they don’t release a wheat just so farmers have another choice to sort through. He says, “In general, we’ve really tried to make sure that when we bring something forward through KWA it is really what we think is a really good fit for production and has real value on acres.”

 In spite of rain, the U.S. corn harvest has pushed forward, USDA’s National Ag Statistics Service said in its weekly Crop Progress report on Tuesday, which was delayed a day due to Columbus Day.

Listen to the report here: https://post.futurimedia.com/krvnam/playlist/futures-one-crop-progress-report-10-9-5248.html

As of Sunday, Oct. 7, 34% of corn was harvested nationwide, 8 percentage points ahead of the average pace of 26%. That was further ahead of normal than the previous week when harvest was even with the of average.

The soybean harvest, on the other hand, is slowing down. As of Sunday, 32% of the crop was harvested, which is 4 percentage points below the five-year average of 36%. That compares to the previous week when harvest was slightly ahead of the average.

Meanwhile, both crops continued to reach maturity ahead of the normal pace. Ninety-three percent of corn was mature, 10 percent ahead of the average of 83%. Soybeans were 91% dropping leaves, 6 percentage points ahead of the average of 85%.

Nationwide, condition ratings for corn is now at 68% good to excellent, as opposed to the 69% good to excellent rating seen last week. Soybeans were unchanged from the previous week with a rating of 68% good to excellent.

Winter wheat planting was 57% finished last week, ahead of 46% at the same time last year and also slightly ahead of the five-year average of 54%. Winter wheat emerged, at 30%, was ahead of last year’s 23% and ahead of the average pace of 28%.

Thirty-nine percent of the sorghum crop was harvested as of Sunday, behind the average pace of 42%.

Seventy-nine percent of rice was harvested as of Sunday, behind last year’s 84% but equal to the five-year average. Seventy-eight percent of cotton had bolls opening, ahead of the average of 74%. Twenty-five percent of cotton was harvested, slightly ahead of last year’s 24% and also ahead of the average pace of 18%.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Mature 93 86 80 83
Corn Harvested 34 26 21 26
Soybeans Dropping Leaves 91 83 88 85
Soybeans Harvested 32 23 34 36
Winter Wheat Planted 57 43 46 54
Winter Wheat Emerged 30 14 23 28
Cotton Bolls Opening 78 67 71 74
Cotton Harvested 25 19 24 18
Sorghum Mature 73 62 68 72
Sorghum Harvested 39 34 35 42
Rice Harvested 79 70 84 79

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP=Very Poor; P=Poor; F=Fair; G=Good; E=Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 4 8 20 47 21 4 8 19 47 22 3 8 25 49 15
Soybeans 3 7 22 49 19 3 7 22 49 19 3 9 27 49 12
Sorghum 5 11 29 44 11 6 11 29 44 10 2 6 28 52 12
Cotton 6 19 33 32 10 6 19 33 32 10 8 7 25 42 18