Tag Archives: wheat

Based on May 1 conditions, Nebraska’s 2019 winter wheat crop is forecast at 50.0 million bushels, up 1 percent from last year’s crop, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Average yield is forecast at 50 bushels per acre, up 1 bushels from last year.

Acreage to be harvested for grain is estimated at 1,000,000 acres, down 10,000 acres from last year. This would be 91 percent of the planted acres, below last year’s 92 percent harvested.

 

US Winter Wheat Production Up 7 Percent from 2018

Winter wheat production is forecast at 1.27 billion bushels, up 7 percent from 2018. As of May 1, the United States yield is forecast at 50.3 bushels per acre, up 2.4 bushels from last year’s average yield of 47.9 bushels per acre.

Hard Red Winter production, at 780 million bushels, is up 18 percent from a year ago. Soft Red Winter, at 265 million bushels, is down 7 percent from 2018. White Winter, at 224 million bushels, is down 5 percent from last year. Of the White Winter production, 22.3 million bushels are Hard White and 201 million bushels are Soft White.

 

Washington, D.C. (May 10, 2019) –Today, the U.S. Trade Representative moved forward with increasing the tariff rate from 10 to 25 percent on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods. Farmers across the country are extremely concerned by the actions taken today by President Trump and his Administration. The National Association of Wheat Growers, the American Soybean Association, and the National Corn Growers Association were expecting a deal by March 1 before farmers went back into the fields but today saw an escalation of the trade war instead. The three commodities represent around 171 million of acres of farmland in the United States.

“U.S. wheat growers are facing tough times right now, and these additional tariffs will continue to put a strain on our export markets and threaten many decades worth of market development,” stated NAWG President and Texas wheat farmer Ben Scholz. “Further, members from both sides of the aisle and Chambers have reservations about the Section 232 tariffs in the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement. Today’s announcement adds on another political barrier, which may hinder Congressional consideration of the Agreement.”

“We have heard and believed the President when he says he supports farmers, but we’d like the President to hear us and believe what we are saying about the real-life consequences to our farms and families as this trade war drags on,” said Davie Stephens, soy grower from Clinton, Ky., and ASA President. “Adding to current problems, it took us more than 40 years to develop the China soy market. For most of us in farming, that is two thirds of our lives. If we don’t get this trade deal sorted out and the tariffs rescinded soon, those of us who worked to build this market likely won’t see it recover in our lifetime.”

“Corn farmers are watching commodity prices decline amid ongoing tariff threats, even while many can’t get to spring planting because of wet weather. Holding China accountable for objectionable behavior is an admirable goal, but the ripple effects are causing harm to farmers and rural communities. Farmers have been patient and willing to let negotiations play out, but with each passing day, patience is wearing thin. Agriculture needs certainty, not more tariffs,” said NCGA President Lynn Chrisp.

Growers have been reeling for almost a year now after the President first imposed a 25 percent duty on $50 billion worth of Chinese goods in July 2018, and later, a 10 percent duty on an additional $200 billion worth of Chinese products, which resulted in the retaliatory tariffs on U.S. goods. These are having a compounding impact not only on agriculture but all industries across the United States.

MANHATTAN, Kan. — A team of Kansas State University wheat scientists are tapping into 10,000 years of evolution in the plant’s genetic code as part of their continued efforts to understand how historic processes that shaped modern wheat can help to improve the varieties grown by today’s farmers.

The exhaustive study, which is published in Nature Genetics, involved sequencing the genomes of nearly 1,000 wheat lines collected from different parts of the world with different environments. The work was led by researchers from K-State and Agriculture Victoria of Australia, in collaboration with the University of Saskatchewan (Canada) and the University of Minnesota.

“We compared the genomes (in the 1,000 wheat lines) against each other, and looked for nucleotide base changes, or mutations, that distinguish one wheat accession from another,” said Eduard Akhunov, a K-State wheat geneticist.

He noted that the researchers found more than 7 million differences in the genetic code of the 1,000 lines.

“These differences can affect the function of genes that control various traits in wheat that helped it adapt to new growth conditions, such as withstanding drought and heat stresses; fighting off diseases; and yielding nutritious grain,” Akhunov said.

The changes that occurred in the genetic code can tell researchers a history of each wheat accession.

“When humans started spreading wheat from the site of its origin to other places, they brought it into contact with wild wheat, and wild ancestors accidentally began to inter-breed with bread wheat,” Akhunov said. “What happened then was that bread wheat  inherited the genetic diversity that was present in the wild emmer wheat.”

That process of one species sharing genes with another species is called gene flow, and it is key for explaining the genetic diversity of today’s wheat varieties, according to K-State wheat breeder Allan Fritz.

“Understanding gene flow between wild emmer and common wheat is more than just academically interesting,” Fritz said. “The importance of historical introgression suggests that a more strategic use of wild emmer should have value for future wheat improvement.”

Fritz noted that K-State scientists have been using wild emmer in developing germplasm for new wheat varieties in projects funded by the Kansas Wheat Association and the university’s Wheat Genetics Resource Center.

The work by Akhunov and his research team allows breeders to “evaluate the diversity in wild emmer and be intentional and strategic” in how they employ desired traits in new wheat varieties, according to Fritz.

“As we move forward, we can apply what has been learned here to also focus future efforts on traits related to health and nutrition that wouldn’t have been direct targets of historical selection,” he said.

Akhunov adds: “For the first time, we have described how wild emmer’s genetic diversity contributed to the development of bread wheat. And what it’s done since humans domesticated wheat is it’s helped to develop a better crop.”

K-State’s study was funded by the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative’s competitive grants program, administered through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture and part of the International Wheat Yield Partnership, which Akhunov said aims at increasing the genetic yield potential of wheat using innovative approaches.

Akhunov also said that Corteva Agriscience and the agriculture division of Dow/DuPont provided financial support through its collaboration with Agriculture Victoria Service. Their support, he said, allowed the researchers access to needed technologies and to develop the set of data indicating the genetic differences in wheat varieties, also called an SNP dataset.

K-State received additional funding from the Kansas Wheat Commission and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

The Winter Wheat Tour made it’s final turn back to the north, to return to Manhattan where it all started just two days prior. Traveling through the flint hills wheat fields were limited, but most cars were able to take in several stops. The major note coming along with the fields was saturated wet conditions. K-State Agronomist Romulo Lollato commented, “The wet fields could lead to more disease pressure if conditions continue.”

The first wheat field of the final day. (RRN Photo)
Taking some of the final measurements of the 2019 Winter Wheat Tour (RRN Photo)
Back in Manhattan the tour ended at the International Grain Building on K-State’s campus. The three-day average yield for the fields that were calculated was 47.2 bushels an acre. While an estimated 7 million acres of wheat were planted in the fall, the Kansas wheat crop varies in condition based on planting date. Wheat that was planted prior to October rains looks good while wheat planted when farmers could get back in fields after the rains is not faring as well. What Mother Nature has in plan for the wheat crop still remains unseen, but the tour captures a moment in time for the yield potential for fields across the state. Tour participants saw wheat that was significantly behind schedule, with most areas a week to 10 days behind normal development.
Giving the final car updates in Manhattan (RRN photo)
Many tour participants had never stepped foot in a wheat field before. These are the millers, bakers, food processors and traders who buy the wheat that Kansas farmers grow. If these fields make it to harvest, the resulting crop will go into breads, but also a number of other food items, from snack cakes to donuts to seasonings, batters and coatings for fish, chicken and appetizers.
Farmers were also in attendance so customers were able to interact with the men and women who produce the product they purchase. Gary Millershaski, a farmer from Lakin, is a wheat tour veteran who believes in the value of the opportunity to get these customers out in the field (and to get their boots a little muddy, too).
“The connections that we make on this tour are unlike anything else,” said Millershaski. “Having producers and our customers driving around in the same vehicles, there’s just a lot of information that gets shared both ways. It helps them learn about the challenges of production and the frustration of the prices we get, and we get to learn about the changing dynamics between them and their customers. It helps to put faces to the wheat they receive. We’re not a number to them after the tour… We’re real.”
The official tour projection for total production of wheat to be harvested in Kansas is 306.5 million bushels. This number is calculated based on the average of estimated predictions from tour participants who gathered information from 469 fields across the state.
Scouts reported seeing widely varying wheat conditions (due, in large part, to planting date) along the route. While there were sightings of rust and other disease in south central Kansas, many stops saw signs of nitrogen deficiency.
In addition, scouts from Nebraska and Colorado met the group in Colby, Kansas, to give reports from their states. The estimate for the Nebraska wheat crop is 47.4 million bushels, down from 49.5 million bushels last year. The estimated yield average is 44 bushels per acre. In Colorado, the estimated yield was 46.5 bushels per acre. Production in Colorado is estimated at 97.2 million bushels, up from 70.5 million bushels last year. Oklahoma reported that the state’s production is estimated at 119.27 million bushels with 37.38 bushels per acre. Approximately 4.2 million acres were seeded last fall.
Scott Foster invites Clay Patton into the studio’s to talk about his trip: http://bit.ly/2VaMZJi

OMAHA (DTN) — U.S. corn planting equaled last year’s pace as of Sunday, April 28, but fell further behind the five-year average, according to USDA NASS’ weekly Crop Progress report on Monday.

As of Sunday, 15% of the nation’s corn was planted, equal to 15% at the same time last year but 12 percentage points behind the five-year average of 27%. In last week’s report, corn planting was 6 percentage points behind the average.

“Noticeable progress was made in Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska and Kansas,” noted DTN Lead Analyst Todd Hultman. “Minnesota, Indiana, Michigan and Ohio are all 2% planted, and South Dakota has yet to start.”

Corn emerged, reported by NASS for the first time this season, was estimated at 3%, also equal to last year but slightly behind the five-year average of 5%.

Soybean planting was estimated at 3% as of April 28, down from last year’s 5% and also below the five-year average of 6%. Planting was still mainly taking place in the Southern states.

Like corn, spring wheat planting also fell further behind the five-year average. NASS estimated that 13% of spring wheat was planted as of Sunday, 20 percentage points behind the five-year average of 33%. In last week’s report, planting was 17 percentage points below the five-year average. Idaho and Washington are past the halfway mark and lead the planting effort, while progress in the Dakotas and Minnesota is still in the single digits.

Winter wheat progress came in at 19% headed as of Sunday, near last year’s 18% but down 10 percentage points from the five-year average of 29%.

Meanwhile, winter wheat condition continued to improve. NASS estimated 64% of winter wheat was in good-to-excellent condition, up 2 percentage points from the previous week. Fifty-eight percent of Kansas winter wheat was considered in good-to-excellent condition.

“States in the eastern Midwest show poor-to-very-poor ratings in the double digits,” Hultman noted.

Sorghum was 20% planted, compared to 26% last year and a 25% five-year average. Cotton planting was 11% complete, compared to 12% last year and a 13% average. Rice was 38% planted, compared to 54% last year and a 57% average. Twenty-seven percent of rice was emerged, compared to 28% last year and an average of 37%.

Oats were 43% planted as of April 28, compared to 38% last year and a 61% average. Oats emerged were at 31%, compared to 29% last year and a 41% average.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Planted 15 6 15 27
Corn Emerged 3 NA 3 5
Soybeans Planted 3 1 5 6
Winter Wheat Headed 19 9 18 29
Spring Wheat Planted 13 5 9 33
Cotton Planted 11 9 12 13
Sorghum Planted 20 17 26 25
Barley Planted 28 17 24 41
Barley Emerged 6 2 6 15
Oats Planted 43 36 38 61
Oats Emerged 31 27 29 41
Rice Planted 38 31 54 57
Rice Emerged 27 18 28 37

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP=Very Poor; P=Poor; F=Fair; G=Good; E=Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Winter Wheat 2 6 28 49 15 2 6 30 48 14 16 21 30 26 7

 

NEBRASKA:

For the week ending April 28, 2019, there were 5.1 days suitable for fieldwork, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 0 percent very short, 6 short, 79 adequate, and 15 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 0 percent very short, 3 short, 83 adequate, and 14 surplus.

Field Crops Report: Corn planted was 16 percent, near 15 last year, but behind 23 for the five-year average.

Soybeans planted was 3 percent, near 5 both last year and average.

Winter wheat condition rated 1 percent very poor, 3 poor, 28 fair, 65 good, and 3 excellent.

Sorghum planted was 1 percent, equal to average.

Oats planted was 55 percent, behind 61 last year, and well behind 84 average. Emerged was 18 percent, behind 28 last year, and well behind 56 average.

KANSAS:  For the week ending April 28, 2019, there were 6.2 days
suitable for fieldwork, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 1 percent very short, 14 short, 77 adequate, and 8 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 1 percent very short, 6 short, 83 adequate, and 10 surplus.

Field Crops Report: Soybeans planted was 2 percent, equal to both last year and the five-year average.

Winter wheat condition rated 3 percent very poor, 8 poor, 31 fair, 48 good, and 10 excellent.

Winter wheat jointed was 64 percent, ahead of 50 last year, but behind 75 average. Headed was 4 percent, near 2 last year, but behind 22 average.

Corn planted was 31 percent, ahead of 25 last year, but behind 36 average. Emerged was 3 percent, near 5 last year, and behind 14 average.

MANHATTAN, Kan. — A Kansas State University research team is putting the finishing touches on the findings from 12 years of work in which they tested the value of growing cover crops in a no-till rotation with wheat, sorghum and soybeans.

Kraig Roozeboom, a research agronomist with K-State Research and Extension, says the group is finding that intensifying the cropping system with cover crops or double-cropping increases soil organic carbon near the surface, potentially leading to such benefits as better soil structure, aggregate size, water infiltration and more.

“We’ve demonstrated that you can grow cover crops in our environment with either neutral or positive benefits on cash-crop yields if managed appropriately,” Roozeboom said. “And there are benefits to the soil when doing that.”

The researchers conducted the study in three-year cycles, which includes harvesting wheat in June of a given year, followed by double-crop soybeans or cover crops through the summer, then sorghum planted the following May. Soybeans are planted the summer after sorghum harvest.

The cycle starts over again with winter wheat planted immediately after harvest of the full-season soybean crop. Roozeboom notes that the entire system is done with no-till farming.

Double-cropping is a strategy of growing two or more crops on the same land in the same growing season.

“The base system is wheat-sorghum-soybeans; spray out any weeds and volunteer wheat that comes out between wheat and sorghum planting,” Roozeboom said. “We call that our chemical fallow check.”

The work by K-State’s group has drawn the attention of the Soil Health Institute, a national organization that aims to raise awareness of soil health in the United States. The Institute selected the long-term experiment coordinated by Roozeboom for intensive sampling this spring. He said it is “one of dozens of sites” being sampled across North America.

“One of their objectives is to get a better handle on how to characterize soil health scientifically,” Roozeboom said.

The study, which began in 2007, has helped to establish the value of cover crops in suppressing weeds and improving soil health. Roozeboom said the results, in most years, indicate no negative impact on yields of the grain crops in the rotation, with appropriate modifications to nitrogen fertilization applied to sorghum.

“In fact, some cover crops have resulted in yields comparable to that obtained in the chemical fallow system but with less nitrogen fertilizer,” Roozeboom said. “The exception came in the summer of 2018. The previous winter and spring were extremely dry. As a result, sorghum yields were reduced dramatically if a cover crop was grown right up to sorghum planting.”

However, he adds, “sorghum yields after cover crops grown the previous summer and terminated in late fall or by frost over the winter were comparable to sorghum yields in the chemical fallow system.”

The economics of the system are still to be determined. Roozeboom notes that cover crops aren’t always the best route for growers, due to the added cost of planting and fertilizing and managing cover crops. The biggest question to researchers – and perhaps most important to farmers – is whether the added cost and time needed to grow cover crops actually benefits them in the end.

“If you’ve got the added component of grazing livestock on the cover crops, then suddenly cover crops have a much better economics component,” Roozeboom said. “Double-crop soybeans also increase the potential for a positive economic result because of the additional grain harvested from the system in most years.”

K-State’s team has published results from parts of the project, and expect to publish more findings soon. More information also is available from local extension agents, and at the K-State Department of Agronomy’s website.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The World Trade Organization handed the United States a win Thursday in a trade dispute with China, ruling that Beijing did not fairly administer quotas on U.S. wheat, rice and corn.

The WTO, the Geneva organization that oversees the rules of global trade, found that China had not been transparent, predictable or fair in managing so-called tariff rate quotas on U.S. grain exports. The import tax, or tariff, is higher on U.S. grain shipments that exceed the quota.

The case, started by the Obama administration, is not directly related to a larger U.S.-China trade standoff: President Donald Trump has slapped tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese imports in a dispute over Beijing’s aggressive drive to challenge U.S. technological dominance; China has retaliated by targeting $110 billion in U.S. products. The two countries are in talks to settle their differences.

The decision Thursday was the second U.S. victory over China this year in a trade dispute over agriculture. In February, the WTO ruled that China unfairly subsidized its grain producers.

“This second important victory for the United States further demonstrates that President Trump will take all steps necessary to enforce trade rules and to ensure free and fair trade for U.S. farmers,” said U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. “The Administration will continue to press China to promptly come into compliance with its WTO obligations.”

China can appeal Thursday’s decision.

Wheat buyers from Morocco and Tunisia got an up close look at the intricacies and reliability of the U.S. grain infrastructure during the April 12-19 Cochran Fellowship Program’s experience in Kansas and Texas. Morocco and Tunisia are part of the Middle East-East and North Africa (MEENA) region which has the largest volume of wheat imports from all origins. While market share in the MEENA region has fallen, there are several expanding end use market segments that hold promise for U.S. wheat. These niche products include specialty artisan and frozen doughs and pre-mixes, pasta from non-durum flour, and growing biscuit, cracker and confectionary products. These products need the high or low protein (depending on the product) wheat with the high quality traits that American wheat is known for.

“While it’s unfortunate that U.S. market share in the MEENA region has dropped due to increased competition, there are some real opportunities for us in those specialty products,” said Aaron Harries, Vice President of Research and Operations for Kansas Wheat. “The U.S. wheat industry has to remain visible to those buyers in order to capitalize on these emerging opportunities, and bringing the Cochran Fellows to Kansas is a great way to do that.”

 

Kansas was the first leg for the Cochran Fellows team. During their first day in the state, the participants visited the research space at the Kansas Wheat Innovation Center, received an overview of the U.S. grain handling infrastructure and grain quality assessment at the IGP Institute, toured the Kansas State University Hal Ross Flour Mill and the OH Kruse Feed Mill and ended their day at the Anderes farm near Junction City. The next day participants visited the Cargill Shuttle Train Loader near Topeka and the Federal Grain Inspection Service Technical Center in Kansas City, Missouri.

 

Morocco and Tunisia’s sub-region relies heavily on grain imports with bread and durum wheat as the most prominent imported cereals. These countries imported 17.35 MMT wheat of all origins in MY16/17, and 1.6 MMT of US wheat in MY16/17, 85% of which was HRW and 14.3% was durum. Morocco does buy smaller quantities of hard red spring, but mostly relies on hard red winter wheat to fill the shortage of domestic or EU production. Tunisia mostly buys U.S. durum.

 

Team participants also visited Houston, Texas. While there, the Cochran fellows experienced Port Houston up close and personal with a Sam Houston Boat Tour along the Houston Ship Channel. This unique opportunity helped buyers to visualize international cargo vessels and operation at the port’s Turning Basin Terminal. Next the Cochran fellows visited the Lansing Terminal to get a full-fledged field-to-vessel look at the country’s wheat industry.

 

“The members of this group of Cochran Fellows were engaged and excited about the U.S. wheat industry,” said Harries. “It’s experiences like these that help to build, or solidify, trading relationships with our export markets.”

 

The Cochran Fellowship Program provides short-term training opportunities to agricultural professionals from middle-income countries, emerging markets, and emerging democracies. Approximately 600 Cochran fellows come to the United States each year to work with U.S. universities, government agencies, and private companies. They receive hands-on training to enhance their technical knowledge and skills in areas related to agricultural trade, agribusiness development, management, policy, and marketing. Since the program’s inception there have been more than 18,000 total fellows from 126 participating countries.

U.S. corn planting slipped behind the five-year average pace and spring wheat planting fell further behind average last week, according to USDA NASS’ weekly Crop Progress report on Monday.

For the week ended Sunday, April 14, 3% of the nation’s corn crop was planted, equal to last year at the same time but 2 percentage points behind the five-year average of 5%. In last Monday’s report, corn planting was reported as equal to the five-year average.

Most corn-planting activity was still only taking place in the Southern states, such as Texas, North Carolina and Tennessee, noted DTN Lead Analyst Todd Hultman.

Spring wheat planting also further behind the average last week. NASS reported that only 2% of spring wheat had been planted as of Sunday, up only 1 percentage point from the previous week, behind 3% at the same time last year and significantly behind the five-year average of 13%.

There was no spring wheat planting progress reported yet in the Dakotas or Minnesota, and only 1% of the crop was planted in Montana.

Progress of the winter wheat crop also slowed last week. Nationwide, 6% of winter wheat was headed as of Sunday, behind 8% at the same time last year and also behind the five-year average of 9%.

The condition of the winter wheat crop, on the other hand, remained steady at 60% good to excellent, the highest good-to-excellent rating at this time of year in seven years. Fifty-nine percent of winter wheat in top-producing Kansas was rated good to excellent.

Sorghum was 16% planted, compared to 20% last year and a 19% five-year average. Cotton planting was 7% complete, compared to 8% last year and a 7% average. Rice was 26% planted, compared to 30% last year and a 35% average. Thirteen percent of rice was emerged, compared to 14% last year and an average of 15%.

Oats were 30% planted as of April 14, compared to 29% last year and a 40% average. Emergence was at 26%, compared to 26% last year and a 28% average.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/…. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Planted 3 2 3 5
Winter Wheat Headed 6 3 8 9
Spring Wheat Planted 2 1 3 13
Cotton Planted 7 6 8 7
Sorghum Planted 16 14 20 19
Barley Planted 8 2 7 19
Oats Planted 30 27 29 40
Oats Emerged 26 25 26 28
Rice Planted 26 19 30 35
Rice Emerged 13 7 14 15

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP=Very Poor; P=Poor; F=Fair; G=Good; E=Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Winter Wheat 2 7 31 48 12 2 7 31 48 12 15 22 32 26 5

 

Listen to Clay Patton with the report here: http://bit.ly/2Df3o4y