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Day 8, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report | KRVN Radio

Day 8, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report

Day 8, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report

This is day 8 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Scattered storms continue to be a theme for #WheatHarvest19 with farmers in the state playing “hurry up and wait.” According to USDA NASS winter wheat condition in the state is rated 4 percent very poor, 11 poor, 27 fair, 42 good and 16 excellent. Winter wheat mature was 92 percent. Harvested was 61 percent, well behind 89 last year and 84 for the five-year average.

David Janzen, a farmer from Butler County, is trying to wrap up his harvest this year, with about 80 acres left to cut. He is hoping the rain stays away long enough for him to get done. Janzen is seeing yields that vary from field to field, but he is fairly pleased with the yields he is seeing, considering the amount of rain he has received this year.

“We are just thankful that we still have a crop to cut,” Janzen said.

Ron Suppes, a farmer in Lane County, has come to a standstill with his wheat harvest as it began to rain again today. His area has had quite a few rain showers with high humidity, which is making it difficult for local farmers to get into the fields. With the wheat that they have harvested, Suppes reports consistent protein levels at 10-11.5% and above average yields.

Romulo Lollato, Wheat and Forages Extension Specialist with K-State Research and Extension, reported yields in south central and central Kansas have been highly variable (due to planting dates and moisture surpluses that drowned out quite a few acres), while out west, farmers are consistently seeing above average yields. Some areas in western Kansas are still seeing some green wheat because it was late getting planted. Test weights throughout the state continue to hold steady at 60 pounds per bushel and above.

“Since September 1, the central part of the state has received over 60 inches of rain, and the rain got in the way of grain production early on,” Lollato said.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

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