Tag Archives: cattle

CENTENNIAL, CO (Sept. 9. 2019) — Just 10 years after its inception, the Beef Checkoff-funded Masters of Beef Advocacy (MBA) program celebrated its 15,000th graduate in August. The program was created to equip and engage beef industry advocates to communicate about beef and beef production. It is one of the strongest beef advocacy efforts in the industry.

A self-directed online training program managed by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff, MBA requires students to complete five lessons in beef advocacy, including The Beef Community; Raising Cattle on Grass; Life in the Feedyard; From Cattle to Beef; and Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. MBA has also been made available via digital download to allow agriculture educators, state beef organization representatives and other beef industry and youth leaders to incorporate the modules into their curriculums.

Once the MBA course has been completed, graduates gain access to resources on the MBA Classroom site, as well as tools to advance their advocacy efforts, including talking points, fact sheets and continuing education opportunities. Graduates are also invited to join the Masters of Beef Advocacy Alumni Facebook group, a virtual community for MBA graduates to share success stories and to receive the latest research and information on the beef industry.

MBA graduates interested in taking their advocacy skills to the next level can participate in state training workshops. These workshops offer more in-depth training on tactical communication skills and provide greater confidence to successfully engage with consumers, both in person and online. More than 70 such workshops and presentations, reaching more than 3,000 beef advocates, were completed in 2018. In addition, a “Top of the Class” program provides more in-depth instruction and training to leading advocates each year who express an interest in advancing their advocacy efforts. Started in 2014, there are now 50 Top of the Class national advocates. Each year, advocates reach tens of millions of consumers as a result of their advocacy efforts.

“As the percentage of consumers with interest in beef production continues to increase, our engagement with them, as well as with food professionals, dietitians, nutritionists and other thought leaders, has become increasingly important,” says Ryan Goodman, director of grassroots advocacy and spokesperson development for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff. “MBA has evolved during the last decade to become a key tool and support system for those who want to advocate for beef and beef producers.”

“We all benefit when consumers better understand our product and how we produce it,” says Laurie Munns, a cattle producer from Hansel Valley, Utah, and chairman of the Federation of State Beef Councils, a division of NCBA. “The MBA program from NCBA is a great Beef Checkoff-funded initiative for increasing beef demand by enhancing what is known about beef and how it comes to market.”

The MBA program is open to everyone, and there is no cost to participate. To enroll or find out more about this checkoff-funded program, go to MastersOfBeefAdvocacy.com.

LINCOLN, NEB. – “Nebraska Farm Bureau (NEFB) would like to thank United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Sonny Perdue for his recent announcement of a Packers and Stockyards investigation to examine beef pricing margins following the fire and subsequent shutdown of the beef processing facility in Holcomb, Kansas. USDA’s efforts to fully investigate the situation is a positive development in this unfortunate situation,” NEFB president Steve Nelson said.

NEFB sent a letter Aug. 22 to USDA Under Secretary of Agriculture for Marketing and Regulatory Programs Greg Ibach urging USDA to fully “investigate monitor and address concerns steaming from the fire.” NEFB asked the agency to shift additional USDA regulatory staff to other plants as needed and to utilize the Packers and Stockyards Division to monitor any unfair, unjustly discriminatory, or deceptive practice in the procurement of livestock

“We are grateful USDA is doing their due diligence in opening this investigation. NEFB would strongly encourage USDA to prosecute any anti-competitive activities if they are found.”

WASHINGTON (Aug. 28, 2019) – National Cattlemen’s Beef Association President Jennifer Houston today issued the following statement regarding U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue’s call for an investigation into cattle markets following the recent fire at a Tyson beef processing facility in Kansas.

“Today’s announcement by Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue demonstrates the government’s understanding of the extreme strain placed on the cattle industry by the plant fire in Holcomb, Kansas.

“We encourage USDA to look at all aspects of the beef supply chain and to utilize internal and external expertise in this investigation. We believe it adds transparency that will help build confidence in the markets among cattlemen and women.”

(Washington, D.C. August 28, 2019) – U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue issued the following statement regarding the beef processing facility in Holcomb, Kan.:

“As part of our continued efforts to monitor the impact of the fire at the beef processing facility in Holcomb, Kan., I have directed USDA’s Packers and Stockyards Division to launch an investigation into recent beef pricing margins to determine if there is any evidence of price manipulation, collusion, restrictions of competition or other unfair practices. If any unfair practices are detected, we will take quick enforcement action. USDA remains in close communication with plant management and other stakeholders to understand the fire’s impact to industry.

I have spent this summer visiting with cattle ranchers across the country, and I know this is a difficult time for the industry as a whole. USDA is committed to ensuring support is available to ranchers who work hard to the feed the United States and the world.”

 Nebraska Farm Bureau is urging the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to use the full authorities granted to the agency to monitor and address concerns stemming from the shutdown of a Holcomb, Kansas beef packing facility following a recent fire. The temporary closing of the plant, which accounted for five percent of the daily U.S. cattle slaughter, has led to considerable consternation for both cattle producers and cattle markets alike.

In an Aug. 22 letter to USDA Under Secretary of Agriculture for Marketing and Regulatory Programs Greg Ibach, Nebraska Farm Bureau President Steve Nelson asked USDA to address a pair of specific issues related to the incident. The first being to help address the considerable shift in cattle slaughter to other plants by USDA shifting additional regulatory staff to those facilities.

“We ask USDA to provide all of the needed grading and inspection staff that will be required to address these needs as quickly as possible,” wrote Nelson in the letter.

In addition to keeping beef processing moving forward, Nebraska Farm Bureau also urged USDA to keep a close eye on cattle markets.

“Given the situation in Kansas and the resulting impacts it has had on cattle prices, we hope USDA and the Packers and Stockyards Division will actively investigate the recent movements in cattle markets. We also hope any anti-competitive activities will be investigated and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law,” wrote Nelson.

The Packers and Stockyards Act makes it unlawful for any packer to engage in or use any unfair, unjustly discriminatory, or deceptive practices or devices as they procure livestock.

“While we certainly understand rules and regulations place restrictions on what assistance can be provided, we hope USDA will use all of its authority to ensure operations run smoothly and beef producers are treated fairly,” wrote Nelson. “We thank you and your team for your time and assistance through this difficult situation and for everything you do for Nebraska farm and ranch families.”

LINCOLN – Governor Pete Ricketts issued a statement following news that President Donald J. Trump and Prime Minister Shinzō Abe of Japan had reached an initial agreement on key parts of a U.S.-Japan trade deal.

 

“For Nebraska, our trade relationship with Japan is one of our most important,” said Governor Ricketts.  “Japan is Nebraska’s number four export market, largest direct international investor, and largest international market for beef, pork, and eggs.  Thank you to President Trump and Ambassador Lighthizer for working with our friends in Japan on crafting a trade deal.  Getting this trade deal done and lowering tariffs for our beef and pork is vital for Nebraska’s farmers and ranchers as well as our Japanese customers.”

 

NEBRASKA AND JAPAN’S TRADE RELATIONSHIP

 

Japan is Nebraska’s fourth largest export market, with over $1.1 billion worth of exports in 2017.  The country is Nebraska’s largest direct international investor with Japanese companies employing about 9,400 people in Nebraska.  They are Nebraska’s number one international customer for beef, pork, eggs and number two for ag exports overall, corn, and wheat.

 

  • Beef:  $412.1 million – #1 market
  • Pork:  $262.7 million – #1 market
  • Corn: $242.4 million – #2 market
  • Soybeans and Soybean Products: $78.5 million
  • Eggs: $21.2 million – #1 market
  • Wheat: $17.8 million – #2 market

 Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.1 million head on August 1, 2019. The inventory was slightly above August 1, 2018. This is the highest August 1 inventory since the series began in 1996, USDA reported on Friday.

Placements in feedlots during July totaled 1.71 million head, 2% below 2018. Net placements were 1.63 million head. During July, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 360,000 head, 600-699 pounds were 260,000 head, 700-799 pounds were 410,000 head, 800-899 pounds were 385,000 head, 900-999 pounds were 200,000 head, and 1,000 pounds and greater were 90,000 head.

Marketings of fed cattle during July totaled 2.00 million head, 7% above 2018.

Other disappearance totaled 71,000 head during July, 13% above 2018.

**

Jerry Stowell, Country Futures, breaks down the report here: https://c1.futuripost.com/krvnam/playlist/cattle-on-feed-august-report-placements-below-100-7485.html 

The report is available at https://www.nass.usda.gov/….

USDA Actual Average Estimate Range
On Feed August 1 100.0% 100.7% 100.5-102.0%
Placed in July 98.0% 100.0% 98.6-108.5%
Marketed in July 107.0% 106.8% 106.1-107.6%

Benefits of a Secure Beef Supply (SBS) Plan, managing anaplasmosis in cowherds and locust tree/yucca shrub control were among the topics discussed at the final KLA/Kansas State University Ranch Management Field Day. Nearly 100 ranchers attended the August 22 event hosted by the Lyman Nuss family near Dorrance.
Kansas Department of Agriculture Animal health Planner Emily Voris explained how producers implementing a SBS Plan on their operations can help sustain the economic viability of the industry during disease outbreak. A Secure Beef Supply Plan is a comprehensive set of biosecurity protocols that can be an efficient and effective response tool to minimize disease spread in the event of an outbreak, like foot-and-mouth. Plans are operation-specific and should encompass biosecurity measures for all inputs and outputs, she said, including employees, vehicles, feed, incoming/outgoing livestock and manure. For more information, visit www.securebeef.org.

K-State veterinarian Hans Coetzee helped ranchers learn how to identify anaplasmosis in cattle, a disease spread through injection needles, flies and ticks and is estimated to cost the industry $300 million annually. Clinical signs include yellow mucus membranes, fever, anorexia, constipation, anemia, abortion and ataxia. There are multiple control methods, he said, including vaccination use and medicated mineral, but advised ranchers to consult a veterinarian to determine the best management strategy for their operation.
Also during the field day, K-State Range Scientist Keith Harmoney explained how to reduce honey locust trees using an aminopyralid/2,4-D application. In addition, he advised to treat yucca shrubs with a triclopyr/diesel mix for individual control or metsulfuron methyl/2, 4-D for dense populations.
Old World bluestem management strategies and a CattleTrace update rounded out the sessions. More coverage of the CattleTrace pilot project will appear in the November/December Kansas Stockman magazine.
Bayer Animal Health and the Farm Credit Associations of Kansas sponsored the field day.

A recent fire at a large Kansas beef processor has boosted margins for other processors. The Tyson Foods facility in Holcomb, Kansas, represents about five percent of the U.S. daily slaughter, or roughly 6,000 head of cattle.

The fire has closed the facility indefinitely as Tyson makes repairs. Reuters says the fire spiked margins for packers, such as Tyson, Cargill and JBS USA to $344 per head of cattle slaughtered, up from $153 the week before the fire. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association responded last week sending letters to federal watchdogs and agencies urging them to assist the market and closely monitor sales.

In order to compensate for the loss of capacity at Holcomb, NCBA says major packing plants in Texas, Kansas, Colorado, Nebraska, and Iowa, would need to slaughter 8.2 percent more cattle per week, or run 3.3 more hours per week. Department of Agriculture undersecretary Greg Ibach says that “as the cattle industry adjusts, USDA stands ready to assist our customers however we can.”