Tag Archives: Corn Planting

Planting continues at an abbreviated pace and for corn the latest crop progress report shows some states almost to the finish line. Emergence is strong across the country for most row crops. The first look at the corn crop condition shows a fairly healthy corp. Winter wheat continues to lag behind the five year average for heading out. Overall winter wheat quality though looks to tick up a few points this week. As for moisture last week’s rains will surely help quite a few mid-west states, but there are still some in the lower 48 that are very dry.

Breaking the report down we start with corn planting. Nationally 88% of the crop is planted. A far cry from last year’s 55% and still ahead of the five year average of 82%. Nebraska and Iowa are both at 97% planted. Well ahead of their respective five year averages. With less than a week until the crop insurance deadline North Dakota is still struggling to get corn planted at only 54%. Well behind the five year average of 79%. Pennsylvania though takes the cake as the slowest planting progress at only 45% complete.

Corn emergence across the country is rated at 64%. Just ahead of the five year average of 58%. Nebraska has 77% of their corn crop emerged, up from the five year average of 61%. Kansas has 60% of their corn crop emerged equal with their five year average and 15% ahead of a year ago. Even though planting is slow Pennsylvania has 47% of their corn crop emerged.

This week’s crop progress report included the first corn condition ratings. Nationally the corn crop is rated at 70% good to excellent. Nebraska is rated at 82% good to excellent. Kansas is rated at 63% good to excellent. The best corn crop surprisingly is in the same state with the slowest plantings. Pennsylvania’s corn crop is rated at 92% good to excellent.

Moving over to the soybeans. Soybean planting nationally is 65% complete. Well ahead of a year ago when it was just 26% complete. Nebraska farmers have 89% of their soybeans planted. Well ahead of the five year average of 62%. Kansas farmers have 52% of their soybeans planted about 21% ahead of the five year average. Soybeans are also emerging steadily. Nationally 35% of the soybean crop has emerged. Nebraska 56% of the soybeans are above ground. That compares to the five year average of 25%. In Kansas soybean fields, 29% of them have emergence.

For winter wheat Texas is the first state to reach the 100% headed out stage. That helped to bring the national percentage of winter wheat headed out to 68%. Still behind the five year average of 72%. Nebraska’s winter wheat farmers have only seen 22% of the crop produce heads so far. That is 18% behind the five year average of 40%. Kansas winter wheat farmers reported 84% of the crop has headed out.

As for winter wheat condition, nationally the crop improved since last week up 2% to 54% good to excellent. Kansas remained unchanged at 40% good to excellent. Nebraska improved 3% to 70% good to excellent. Colorado wheat farmers are still struggling with a poor crop as only 32% of the winter wheat is considered good to excellent.

A fun side tour on the crop progress report. With some corn belt states reporting over six to seven inches of rain last week there have been quite a few jokes about switching from corn to rice. Looking at national rice planting it is 89% complete vs. the five year average of 92%.

Coming towards the bottom of the report we see the pasture and range condition which shows Nebraska range rated at 82% good to excellent. Kansas range is rated at 56% good to excellent.

Topsoil moisture looks to be strong in Nebraska at 91% adequate to surplus. In Kansas top soil is rated at 77% adequate to surplus. Subsoil moisture in Nebraska is rated at 89% adequate to surplus. While Kansas subsoil moisture is rated at 76% adequate to surplus.

Looking at the subsoil chart there are 4 states including; Arizona, Colorado, California and Oregon that are rated 20-29% very short. New Mexico though looks to be the driest in the country with a sub soil moisture combined rating of 79% short to very short.

Clay Patton breaks down the full report here:

If you would like to see the full crop progress report visit this link: https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/9c67x7852/8910kd63p/prog2220.pdf

This week’s crop progress numbers reported by NASS show planting for corn and soybeans quickly nearing the finish line in several states. Winter wheat quality stays almost unchanged week to week. Moisture levels changed slightly from last week.

NASS does make note at the top of the report that in the first two weeks of June it will gather information about this season’s crop production, supplies of grain in storage, and livestock inventory. The information will help producers, suppliers, traders, buyers and others make informed business decisions. The results will be available on June 25 in the Hogs and Pigs report and on June 30 in the Acreage and Grain Stocks reports. Farmers should watch for their surveys in the mail soon.

Back to crop progress corn planting nationally was 80% complete compared to the 5 year average of 71%. Looking back last year with the numerous planting delays corn planting is up 36%. Nebraska along with several I states and Minnesota have less than 10% of the corn crop left to plant. As of May 17, 91% of Nebraska’s corn is planted. Well ahead of the 5 year average of 78%. Kansas is 74% planted just 2% ahead of the 5 year average. While most states are ahead on their corn planting other states are struggling to get going. Pennsylvania drags the nation with the least corn planted at only 15%. Well behind the 5 year average of 49%.

With over half the corn crop already planted corn emergence is strong across the country. Nationally 43% of the corn crop is emerged up 19% week to week. That is ahead of the 5 year average of 40%. Nebraska is now over the half way mark with 54% of the corn emerged. Up 24% week to week and 32% ahead of a year ago. Kansas has 45% of it’s corn crop emerged. Up from the five year average of 46%.

It’s a similar story in soybean planting with 53% of the nations soybeans planted. A far cry from last years 16%  at the same time. Nebraska has 78% of the soybeans planted up 34% from a year ago and up from the 5 year average of 42%. Kansas has 37% of the soybean crop planted up from the 5 year average of 22%.

Right alongside the corn, soybeans are emerging well. Nationally 18% of the soybeans are above ground. Just 6% ahead of the 5 year average. Nebraska takes soybean emergence one notch better with 29% of the crop emerged. That’s 23% emerged since last week and 24% more emerged than a year ago. Kansas more than doubles their 5 year average with 15% of soybeans emerged. The 5 year average for Kansas is 7%.

Sorghum made another notable appearance in USDA’s weekly export inspections on Monday, but for the current crop US producers are a little behind. Nationally sorghum planting is considered 32% complete as compared to the 5 year average of 34%. Nebraska breaks the national trend with 28% of the sorghum planted as compared to the 5 year average of 22%. Kansas has planted 9% of the sorghum crop compared to the 5 year average of 4%.

For some, time seems to be flying by and custom harvesters are starting to make their way South. Winter wheat heading out is a little behind this year though. 56% of the national winter wheat crop has headed out. Compared to the 5 year average of 62%. Kansas has 61% of it’s winter wheat crop headed out well behind the 5 year average of 75%. Nebraska winter wheat heading is rated at 5% compared to 23% on the 5 year average. Still looking at last year Nebraska is near par with 2019 winter wheat heading out at this time was at 6%.

Winter wheat quality was fairly steady week to week. Nationally winter wheat dropped 1% to 52% good to excellent. Kansas winter wheat went up 2% to 40% good to excellent. Nebraska remained unchanged week to week at 67% good to excellent. Colorado winter wheat is fairly even across all categories now with 28% good to excellent, 28%, fair, 22% poor and 22% very poor. No other major winter wheat growing state has double digit very poor wheat quality.

Oats look fairly good across the country. Nationally the oat crop is rated 75% good to excellent. Nebraska’s oat crop is rated at 68% good to excellent. Iowa’s oat crop is rated at 70% good to excellent.

Pasture and range condition for Nebraska was rated 78% good to excellent with 0% in the very poor stage. Kansas pasture and range was rated 53% good to excellent. 10% now in the poor stage.

Moisture ticked up a little in Kansas and down a little in Nebraska. Topsoil moisture for Nebraska was rated at 77% adequate to surplus down 3% from last week. Kansas topsoil moisture was rated at 66% adequate to surplus up 10% week to week. Nebraska subsoil moisture was rated at 84% adequate to surplus unchanged week to week. Kansas subsoil moisture was rated at 72% adequate to surplus up 3% from last week.

See the entire report here: https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/kd17dd70q/gm80jg11q/prog2120.pdf

Clay Patton recaps the report:

Following frigid temps over the weekend the Monday crop progress report presented by NASS was eagerly anticipated. Specifically corn and soybean planting. Along with corn and soybean emergence.

To not keep readers in suspense the latest crop progress report shows across the nation 67% of the corn crop planted. That is well ahead of the 5 year average of 56%. 24% of the national corn crop has emerged. That is 2% ahead of the five year average.  In the Corn Husker state 79% of the corn crop is planted, 19% ahead of the five year average. 30% of Nebraska’s corn crop has emerged nearly double the five year average of 18%. Kansas has 61% of it’s corn crop planted. Just 3% ahead of the 5 year average for Kansas. In contrast to other states just 29% of the Kansas corn crop has emerged. 3% behind the five year average. Iowa takes the top spot for corn planting with 91% of the corn crop planted. 25% ahead of the five year average. Over a third of the already planted crop has emerged in Iowa or 33%. Well ahead of the five year average emergence rate of 20%. While there is not a quality rating yet on the corn crop this past weekends freeze could very well caused damage to the crop in the northern part of the corn belt.

From corn to soybeans 38% of the nations soybean crop has been planted. 15% ahead of the five year average. 7% of the soybean crop has already emerged. That is just 3% ahead of the five year average. In Nebraska 54% of the soybean crop is planted. Making it 31% ahead of the five year average.6% of the Nebraska soybean crop has emerged. Nearly in line with it’s five year average of 5%. Kansas likewise is well ahead in soybean planting with 23% of the crop in the ground. Compared to the five year average of 11%. In Kansas 6% of the soybeans have emerged. That puts Kansas 4% ahead of its’ five year average for soybean emergence at 2%. Again Iowa is at the front of the pack for planting soybeans at already 71% complete. That is 47% ahead of the five year average. Even with that much of the crop already in the ground only 6% has emerged, 5% ahead of the five year average.

Winter wheat has also kept traders and analysts guessing. Last week there was an uptick in wheat quality as heads were just starting to emerge in the Southern US. This week 44% of the winter wheat crop has headed out. That is below the five year average of 50%. Nebraska has only 1% of the crop starting to put on heads. Which may be okay given the recent cold snap. Still Nebraska should be closer to 8% headed out according to the five year average. 39% of the Kansas winter wheat crop has headed out. Nearly 20% behind the five year average of 56%. Oklahoma may be a good gauge for how sluggish the winter wheat crop is maturing for this time of year. Typically 90% of the winter wheat in Oklahoma has headed out by now. This year only 82% has headed out.

As stated above last week winter wheat quality improved last week. The improvement was short lived. Going into the second week in May the national winter wheat quality dropped 2% to 53% good to excellent. Nebraska remained unchanged week to week at 67% good to excellent. Kansas dropped 4% to 38% good to excellent. Kansas also nearly topped the double digits in very poor winter wheat at 7%. Colorado’s winter wheat is currently one of the poorest crops in the country with a rating of 35% good to excellent, with the highest very poor rating at 19%.

Dry conditions are in South West Kansas are starting to take their toll on the range. This week only 54% of Kansas pasture is considered good to excellent. In Nebraska 77% of the pasture is considered good to excellent.

Moisture conditions continue to dwindle for the Southern plains, but seemed to increase slightly in the Northern plains. Nebraska topsoil is rated at 77% adequate to surplus, up 9% from last week. With subsoil rated at 84% adequate to surplus, up 1%. Kansas top soil moisture dropped 5% from last week to 56% adequate to surplus this week. Kansas topsoil moisture also broke into the double digits of very short topsoil moisture at 11% very short. Kansas subsoil moisture was rated at 69% adequate to surplus, down 3% from last week. New Mexico still has the driest soil with a top soil rating of 31% very short and a subsoil rating of 30% very short. Oregon is a nearby second in short subsoil moisture with a rating of 22% very short.

You can see the whole crop progress report here: https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/2227n944k/9s161s44t/prog2020.pdf

Clay Patton recaps the crop progress report here:

It’s all about the planting and emergence at this stage of the farm cycle in North America. The latest numbers from USDA and NASS show that across the country conditions have been near perfection for planting most crops.

Last week the US had planted 27% of the corn crop. This week that number jumped 24% to 51% planted. This is well ahead of the five year average of 39%. The corn planted number zoomed over many analysts estimates. Nebraska followed suite with strong corn plantings jumping 41% week to week with 61% of the crop now planted. That is well over the 5 year average of 38%. Kansas continues to be a sluggish state with only 42% of it’s corn crop planted 3% back from the five year average. Iowa is so far in the lead for corn planting at 78% complete almost 2 and a half times their five year average.

Now that the corn is in the ground it is also starting to emerge. Nationally corn emergence is rated at 8% vs. the five year average of 10%. Nebraska has 9% of the corn crop above ground 4% ahead of the five year average. In Kansas 13% of the corn crop is emerged as compared to the 5 yr average of 19%.

The next crop planting number that many were waiting for today was the soybean crop. Nationally 23% of the soybean crop is planted up from the five year average of 11%.  Nebraska has planted 32% of it’s soybean crop nearly tripling the five year average of 10%. Where Kansas falls behind in corn planting it makes up for in soybeans. 11% of the Kansas soybean crop is planted compared to the 5 yr average of 4%.

It was just a few short weeks ago that the weather pattern looked much different. For nearly a week in Mid-April the nightly low recorded a hard freeze. This has some concerned about winter wheat heading out. Which the latest data shows is a little behind. Nationally 32% of the winter wheat crop has headed out compared to the five year average of 38%. In Kansas only 17% of the winter wheat crop has headed out just half of the five year average of 34%. Oklahoma which saw a decent part of the state freeze in that weather event currently has 71% of the winter wheat crop headed out. Just 2% behind the five year average. Nebraska has yet to report a head, but that if fairly typical this time of year with the five year average at only 2%.

Winter wheat quality seemed to improve across the nation. Nationally the winter wheat cropped jumped 1% to 55% good to excellent. In Nebraska the Winter wheat crop improved 3% to 67% good to excellent. Kansas winter wheat improved 2% to 42% good to excellent. The best winter wheat crop continues to be held by Washington state at 77% good to excellent. Ohio this week eclipses South Dakota and North Carolina with a rating of 73% good to excellent.

Week five is the first crop progress report to include the pasture and range condition. In Nebraska the range looks fairly strong at 71% good to excellent. In Kansas with South West Kansas on the brink of drought the range is only rated at 56% good to excellent.

Moisture conditions continue to reflect Kansas dryness. Top soil moisture in Kansas is rated at 61% adequate to surplus with 9% very short. Subsoil moisture in Kansas is rated at 72% adequate to surplus. In Nebraska moisture is more abundant, but starting to dry up. Topsoil moisture is rated at 71% adequate to surplus. Nebraka’s subsoil moisture is rated at 83% adequate to surplus. New Mexico and California quickly dwindled on moisture week to week. Top soil moisture in New Mexico is rated 31% very short and in California top soil moisture is rated 20% very short.

If you would like to see the full crop progress report for your self. Check it out here: https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/8336hn37s/q237jc137/prog1920.pdf

Clay Patton has a full report break down here:

Has China returned to some buying of U.S. goods?  Is there some improvement in the ethanol margins?  Corn, beans & cattle bring a positive day.  Fastest planting pace in a few years.  Will there be a bean vs. corn acre war this year?  Trade of the dollar today could that be supportive to the export markets?  Live cattle saw higher number while feeders struggled.

 

Week four of USDA and NASS’s crop progress report is out. Corn and soybeans continue to be planted at an upbeat pace. Winter wheat quality continues to erode week to week.

We will start with corn planting with farmers now having planted 27% of the crop vs. the five year average of 20%. Nebraska is also ahead of schedule at 20% planted vs. the five year average of 16%. Kansas is one of the few states that has fallen behind the pace at 24% planted vs. the five year average of 31%. North Carolina and Texas are the furthest along in corn planting with each state over the 60% mark and close to their respective 5 year average.

While early in the growing season there is some corn above the ground and nationally 3% of the crop is reported to have emerged thus far.

Soybean planting is still in the early stages, but many area’s are nearly double their five year average for soybeans in the ground. Nationally soybean planting is rated at 8% done double the five year average of 4%. Nebraska one up’s the nation with 8% of the soybean crop planted four times that of the five year average at 2%. Kansas merely doubles their soybean planting numbers at 2% vs the five year average of 1%.

With sorghum gaining some notoriety on the export side farmers are ensuring there will be more supplies in the 2020/2021 marketing year.  A quick look at grain sorghum planting in the US shows progress at 20% vs. the five year average of 23%.

From crops going into the ground to a crop that will be harvested in just a matter of months. That is winter wheat and given the cold snap just a few weeks ago the crop quality continues to decline. Nationally the winter wheat crop is rated 54% good to excellent down from last week’s 57% good to excellent. Nebraska’s winter wheat followed a similar pattern dropping 5% week to week to 64% good to excellent. Kansas winter wheat quality dropped 6% to 40% good to excellent. South Dakota remains hot on the heels of the top crop in the country at 72% good to excellent, but for the second week will fall behind North Carolina and Washington both at 76% good to excellent.

We end on the soil moisture which is still strong across the northern plains, but further to the south things are starting to look a little dry. Nebraska top soil moisture is rated at 84% adequate to surplus with 1% in the very short category. Nebraska subsoil moisture is also similar at 88% adequate to surplus with 0% in the very short category. Kansas topsoil moisture 69% adequate to surplus with 6% in the very short category. Kansas subsoil moisture picks up a little bit to 74% adequate to surplus, but still has 6% in the very short category. To note though the state with the most in the very short category for both top soil and subsoil is not in the south central part of the US, but rather the west coast. Oregon is rated 21% very short for topsoil moisture and 18% very short for subsoil moisture.

You can see the full report for yourself right here: https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/vd66wk03z/9z903k54h/prog1820.pdf

Clay Patton recaps the report:

The third week of USDA NASS Crop Progress reports is out and shows corn and soybean planting slowly getting started. Winter wheat condition dropped nominally following last week’s cold snap. Soil moisture is plentiful across the northern plains, but starts to get thin the further south you go.

Nationally corn planting was considered 7% complete vs. the five year average at 9%. Nebraska corn planting was rated at 2% complete vs. it’s 5 year average of 5%. Kansas corn planting fell even further behind at 13% complete 7% lower than it’s 5 year average.  This is the second week for corn planting numbers.

This week gave us the first glimpse at soybean planting across the country. Nationally 2% of the crop is in the ground. That’s ahead of the 5 year average at 1%. Nebraska, Iowa and Kansas have yet to put an official soybean seed into the ground.

Sorghum planting is rolling right along keeping pace with the five year average at 19% planted. Nebraska is just getting started at 1% planted.

Farmers, traders, and analysts were keen to see where the winter wheat condition fell on Monday following last week’s cold blast. Nationally the winter wheat rating dropped 5% to 57% good to excellent. Nebraska winter wheat was rated at 69% good to excellent compared to 77% good to excellent last week. Kansas dropped 4% to 46% good to excellent. North Carolina took the top spot for the best rated wheat corp at 77% good to excellent. Washington comes in to a close second at 72% good to excellent. South Dakota went from number one last week to number three this week with a winter wheat rating of 70% good to excellent.

Winter wheat heading out is slightly behind the 5 year average at 14% headed out. Kansas and Nebraska have 0% of the crop heading out currently.

Soil moisture in the Northern Plains is holding fairly well, but starts to drop quickly when you head South. Nebraska’s top soil moisture is rated at 92% adequate to surplus. Subsoil moisture in Nebraska is rated at 92% adequate to surplus. Kansas topsoil moisture is rated at 70% adequate to surplus with 5% now in the very short category. Subsoil moisture is rated similar in Kansas at 76% adequate to surplus.

See the entire report here: https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/ng452348v/pg15c017h/prog1720.pdf