Tag Archives: corn

The U.S. Grains Council (USGC) in conjunction with the Nebraska Corn Board and the Iowa Corn Promotion Board will soon bring a Japanese trade team of feed milling professionals to the United States. While here, the team will visit Nebraska, Iowa and Washington to better understand the U.S. corn marketing system and pave the way for continued growth in grain, ethanol and co-product sales to the country.

The team of five, including feed milling decision makers, are in the United States to see firsthand U.S. corn, co-products and ethanol production, meeting directly with U.S. suppliers and exporters.

“Prospective corn buyers from any country want to experience every point in the value chain. That’s why the Council strives to bring buyers together with sellers to facilitate trade around the world,” said Ryan LeGrand, president and CEO of the U.S. Grains Council. “Japan has been a longstanding trading partner with the U.S. and is our second largest buyer of grains in all forms. We are excited to educate these newer, less-experienced Japanese feed corn millers, showcase major production facilities and farms in our country and demonstrate just how proud we are of the corn quality in the U.S., so we can continue to cement these relationships for U.S. farmers and Japanese end-users for years to come.”

Japan ranks as the second largest buyer of U.S. corn and U.S. sorghum, the third largest market for U.S. barley and the ninth largest buyer of U.S. DDGS.

Japan more than doubled U.S. ethanol imports to 934,000 gallons (331,000 bushels in corn equivalent) in 2017/2018, the most since 2010/2011. Using information provided by the Council, the Japanese Ministry of Economy (METI) modified its policy in 2018 to allow U.S. corn-based ethanol in the market based on technological advancements that raised the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction level of U.S. corn-based ethanol and allowed near-term imports of ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE) made with nearly 100 million gallons of ethanol.

“Nebraska has a long-standing tradition and reputation of producing quality ag products,” said David Bruntz, chairman of the Nebraska Corn Board. “We’re appreciative of Japan’s business and we’re working to strengthen this relationship well into the future. I’m excited for this group to be in our great state.”

During their time in Iowa and Nebraska, participants will visit a corn farm operation, grain elevator with a rail terminal, ethanol plant and feed mill before flying to Washington to stop in at an export terminal where they will see how grain is sampled and goes through grain inspection before making its way to Japan.

 

 

Over the last several years, Nebraska Corn has provided real-world experiences and opportunities for college interns. These students work directly with Nebraska Corn cooperating organizations including the U.S. Grains Council, the U.S. Meat Export Federation and the National Corn Growers Association.

Each year, Nebraska Corn offers several internship opportunities. Six of the internships are located outside of the state and the other two are located in the offices of the Nebraska Corn Board and the Nebraska Corn Growers Association, both in Lincoln, Nebraska. All eight opportunities are paid internship experiences. Applications for these internships are now available at www.nebraskacorn.gov! Descriptions and applications deadlines can be found below.

2020-2021 Internship Opportunities

Communications and Outreach Internship
Host: Nebraska Corn Growers Association
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Duration: May 2020 – May 2021
Application Due Date: Nov. 1, 2019

**New Option for 2020**
International Relations Internship (Deadline quickly approaching!)
Host: U.S. Grains Council
Location: Washington, D.C.
Duration: Jan. 2020 – May 2020 (with option to continue for a full year)
Application Due Date: Oct. 4, 2019

Communications and Market Development Internship (Deadline quickly approaching!)
Host: Nebraska Corn Board
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Duration: September 2019 – May 2020
Application Due Date: Sept. 20, 2019

Communications and Market Development Internship
Host: Nebraska Corn Board
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Duration: May 2020 – May 2021
Application Due Date: Nov. 1, 2019

Marketing and Communications Internship
Host: National Corn Growers Association
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Duration: Summer 2020
Application Due Date: Nov. 1, 2019

Public Policy Internship
Host: National Corn Growers Association
Location: Washington, D.C.
Duration: Summer 2020
Application Due Date: Nov. 1, 2019

Promotion and International Relations Internship
Host: U.S. Meat Export Federation
Location: Denver, Colorado
Duration: Summer 2020
Application Due Date: Nov. 1, 2019

International Relations Internship
Host: U.S. Grains Council
Location: Washington, D.C.
Duration: Summer 2020
Application Due Date: Nov. 1, 2019

International Agricultural Relations Internship
Host: U.S. Grains Council
Location: Panama City, Panama
Duration: Summer 2020
Application Due Date: Nov. 1, 2019

 

 

Corn was rated 55% in good-to-excellent condition, down 3 percentage points from 58% the previous week, while soybean condition was also rated 55%, unchanged from the previous week, according to this week’s USDA NASS Crop Progress report.

Corn in the dough stage was 89%, corn dented was 55% and corn mature was 11%. Soybeans setting pods reached 92%.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/…. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

Clay Patton breaks down the report: https://c1-green.futuripost.com/krvnam/playlist/futures-one-crop-progress-report-corn-condition-drops-7600.html

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Dough 89 81 99 97
Corn Dented 55 41 84 77
Corn Mature 11 6 33 24
Soybeans Setting Pods 92 86 100 99
Spring Wheat Harvested 71 55 92 87
Cotton Bolls Opening 43 36 38 37
Cotton Harvested 7 NA 9 6
Sorghum Headed 97 92 99 98
Sorghum Coloring 65 52 78 74
Sorghum Mature 27 24 33 37
Sorghum Harvested 22 21 24 24
Barley Harvested 82 72 91 92
Oats Harvested 89 84 96 95
Rice Harvested 30 21 39 37

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP = Very Poor; P = Poor; F = Fair; G = Good; E = Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 4 10 31 45 10 3 10 29 47 11 4 8 20 47 21
Soybeans 3 9 33 45 10 3 10 32 46 9 3 7 22 50 18
Cotton 3 15 39 37 6 1 14 37 39 9 13 21 28 29 9
Sorghum 1 5 26 53 15 1 5 27 53 14 5 12 30 42 11
Rice 1 5 25 46 23 1 4 25 47 23 3 22 59 16

**

National Soil Moisture Condition – 48 States
(VS = Very Short; SH = Short; AD = Adequate; SR = Surplus)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR
Topsoil Moisture 10 23 61 6 9 22 62 7 9 19 58 14
Subsoil Moisture 8 22 64 6 7 22 65 6 10 23 58 9

President Donald Trump says “the farmers will be so happy” when they see what the White House is doing for ethanol. On Twitter, Trump says “it will be a giant package, get ready.”

Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue at the Farm Progress Show this week said President Trump would announce details within the next couple of weeks. Perdue declined to offer any details, other than he pushed for easier access to higher blends of biofuels. Trump says that while the package will be welcomed by farmers, it also saved “the small refineries from certain closing.”

Ethanol groups have charged that small refinery waivers are killing demand for biofuels, because they exempt refiners from complying with volume requirements in the Renewable Fuel Standard. The Environmental Protection Agency recently announced 31 waivers for small refineries in 2020. In the last year of the Obama administration, the EPA issued seven waivers. Trump has held several White House meetings with cabinet members over the last two weeks, working a mitigation package.

LINCOLN, Neb. – As harvest approaches after an extremely difficult year for agriculture, many Nebraska corn farmers are outraged by the Trump administration’s lack of support for the American farmer. The Nebraska Corn Board and the Nebraska Corn Growers Association call upon the administration to fulfill its promises and to abide by the law and uphold the integrity of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

President Trump’s administration continues to erode the RFS by granting 31 unjustified refinery waivers, destroying demand for corn and ultimately choosing to bail out the oil industry rather than helping American farmers. Corn farmers are already suffering from ongoing trade disputes, uncertain weather and continued low prices.

“I’ve never experienced anything like this,” said David Bruntz, chairman of the Nebraska Corn Board and farmer from Friend. “All we’re getting is lip service. At one moment, we think President Trump is on our side, and then the refinery waivers come through. It’s truly a slap in the face. Farmers are hurting and it just keeps getting worse.”

Along with undermining the RFS, the U.S. has made little progress in trade. A new deal between the U.S., Mexico and Canada still has not been reached and tensions continue to escalate between the U.S. and China.

“Many of our corn farmers have stood with Trump for a long time, but that may soon change” said Dan Nerud, president of the Nebraska Corn Growers Association and farmer from Dorchester. “Trump needs to uphold the law and his commitment to our nation’s corn farmers by making the RFS whole and bringing trade agreements to the finish line.”

Nebraska Corn urges you to stand up for our state’s corn and ethanol industries by telling the Trump administration to stop stripping the RFS. Rural America is under attack and now is the time to act. Submit a letter to President Trump by clicking here. Submit comments before the August 30 deadline.

President Donald Trump this week asked cabinet members to appease farmers angry over small refinery waivers. Following a rash of blowback from ethanol and commodity groups, Trump held a meeting to find a solution.

Representatives from the Departments of Energy and Agriculture, along with the Environmental Protection Agency attended a two-hour meeting Monday on the subject, according to Reuters. However, no clear action has been identified so far. The EPA has received 42 requests for small-refiner exemptions for 2018, while there are only 48 classified small refineries in the United States. The waivers exempt refineries from provisions in the Renewable Fuel Standard.

Farmers argue that reallocating the exempted gallons of biofuel would be a good start in addressing the issue. The National Corn Growers Association says the waived volume now accounts for 4.04 billion ethanol gallons. NCGA President Lynn Chrisp says, “waivers reduce demand for ethanol, lower the value of our crop and undermine the President’s support for America’s farmers.”

Corn was rated 57% in good-to-excellent condition, down 1 percentage point from the previous week, and soybean condition was rated 54%, unchanged from the previous week, according to this week’s USDA NASS Crop Progress report. Corn silking was estimated at 78% and soybeans blooming were pegged at 72% as of Sunday, Aug. 4.

Check this page throughout the afternoon for additional highlights from this week’s report.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/…. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

Clay Patton breaks down the report here: https://post.futurimedia.com/krvnam/playlist/futures-one-usda-crop-progress-report-7322.html

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Silking 78 58 95 93
Corn Dough 23 13 54 42
Soybeans Blooming 72 57 91 87
Soybeans Setting Pods 37 21 73 63
Winter Wheat Harvested 82 75 89 92
Spring Wheat Harvested 2 NA 12 14
Cotton Squaring 95 86 91 93
Cotton Setting Bolls 59 45 58 61
Sorghum Headed 45 33 67 62
Sorghum Coloring 23 21 30 30
Barley Harvested 3 NA 14 18
Oats Harvested 32 21 49 49
Rice Headed 60 42 79 73

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP = Very Poor; P = Poor; F = Fair; G = Good; E = Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 3 10 30 47 10 3 9 30 47 11 3 7 19 50 21
Soybeans 3 10 33 45 9 3 10 33 45 9 3 7 23 51 16
Spring Wheat 5 22 63 10 1 5 21 62 11 1 5 20 60 14
Cotton 1 12 33 44 10 1 10 28 46 15 11 21 28 32 8
Sorghum 1 5 26 54 14 1 3 25 59 12 6 12 33 42 7
Barley 5 19 64 12 5 18 62 15 2 19 64 15
Oats 2 6 27 54 11 2 6 26 53 13 4 3 22 58 13
Rice 1 6 25 45 23 1 6 25 48 20 1 7 23 56 13

**

National Soil Moisture Condition – 48 States
(VS = Very Short; SH = Short; AD = Adequate; SR = Surplus)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR
Topsoil Moisture 9 28 57 6 7 24 61 8 14 28 53 5
Subsoil Moisture 6 23 65 6 4 19 69 8 13 29 54 4