Tag Archives: Nebraska

After extreme highs and lows in Nebraska throughout the wheat growing season, harvest has finally begun. Producers along the southern border and in the southwest corner of the state have cleaned and tuned up their combines and are hitting the fields this week. As the month progresses we will see harvest continue to move into the northern panhandle to wrap up Nebraska’s wheat growing season.

Mother Nature was not kind to wheat farmers this year. Hard late freezes, minimal moisture and one of the hottest June’s in history took its toll on the state’s crop. “The April freezes claimed some fields and also left the crop standing shorter than normal” said Royce Schaneman, Executive Director of the Nebraska Wheat Board. “Producers were continually weary throughout the season due to the lack of rain paired with hot, windy days. The soil moisture seemed to be continually depleted.”

For most of the state, harvest is beginning earlier than normal with the exception of the southeast corner being a week late. Mark Knobel, a wheat farmer from Fairbury, NE said “I expect yields to be average this year. Protein content should be good due to the lower yields, though we may find ourselves in trouble if we get low test weights.”

Along with Hard Red Winter wheat, Nebraska will also be harvesting around 10,000 acres of Hard Red Spring wheat this year. The Hard Red Spring variety began appearing in the state a few years ago as farmers looked for alternative wheat markets and value added products. Acres planted has been on a gradual increase, though this year’s crop may not fair the best. “My spring wheat is standing 10” tall,” explained Brent Robertson, a wheat farmer near Elsie, NE. “It is beginning to turn, though I don’t expect to see a good return on it this year.”

As the Nebraska wheat harvest goes into full effect this upcoming week, producers will gain a better understanding of where their crop stands this year. There are many predictions of an average crop and the United States Department of Agriculture is predicting a 44.4 million bushel harvest.

To stay up to date on the Nebraska wheat harvest, follow the Nebraska Wheat Board on Twitter at @NebraskaWheat or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nebraskawheatboard.

The Nebraska Wheat Board administers the check-off of 0.4% of net value of wheat marketed in Nebraska at the point of first sale.  The board invests the funds in programs of international and domestic market development and improvement, policy development, research, promotion, and education.

The latest crop progress report shows the hot and dry weather in the Midwest has yet to impact major crop conditions. It has though significantly dropped the top and subsoil moisture. Winter wheat harvest continues to roll on pace with it’s five year average doubling week to week.

Corn planting is considered complete by NASS across the country. Thus the crop progress report this week starts off with corn emergence, which like planting, is nearly complete. 95% of the countries corn crop has emerged – 3% ahead of the five year average. Kansas has seen 95% corn emergence – an increase of 9% from the previous week. Nebraska has 98% corn emergence – just 2% ahead of the five year average. While several states are at the 98-99% emergence rate, only one state has reached 100% emergence. That is North Carolina which only needed 2% more to emerge from last week to reach 100%.

Nationally, the corn crop did see a slight drop in condition rating going from 75% good to excellent to 71% good to excellent. Kansas corn condition fell 6% from last week to 54% good to excellent. Nebraska’s corn rating fell 12% to 71% good to excellent. Pennsylvania still runs one of the strongest corn crops in the nation at 91% good to excellent, improving 1% since last week.

The soybean planting report was still released this week, but it is quickly nearing the 100% mark. Nationally 93% of the soybean crop is planted, up 7% from last week and 5% ahead of the five year average. Nebraska inched 2% week to week to officially finish soybean planting. Kansas improved 10% week to week to 89% complete. That is 13% ahead of the five year average.

Soybean emergence continues 6% ahead of the five year average nationally at 81%. Nebraska soybean emergence is now rated at 94% – 10% ahead of the five year average. Kansas opened it’s lead on the five year average to 20% this week with 73% of the soybean crop already emerged. No state has hit the 100% emergence rating yet.

The national soybean condition is rated 72% good to excellent, equal with the rating a week ago. Nebraska soybeans dropped 4% from 82% yo 78% good to excellent. Kansas soybean rating fell 3% to 64% good to excellent. Iowa saw a large drop week to week on the soybean rating. Going from 82% good to excellent last week to 72% good to excellent this week.

Grain sorghum planting is continuing at a steady pace, up 15% from last week nationally to 79% good to excellent. Nebraska sorghum planting is 9% ahead of the five year average to 97% complete. National sorghum rating fell 7% to 48% good to excellent. Nebraska sorghum is rated 55% good to excellent.

Winter wheat is almost completely headed out. Nationally 91% of the crop is considered headed out. Nebraska is still lagging 7% from the five year average to 85%. Kansas is right on pace at 99% headed out. Montana is the furthest from being completely headed out at only 28%. That is up 23% from last week, but 19% behind the five year average.

Winter wheat harvest doubled week to week from 7% to 15% complete. Right on pace with the five year average. Kansas is 1% ahead of the five year average at 9% complete. Nebraska has yet to start winter wheat harvest. Texas is the furthest along with winter wheat harvest at 38% complete. Up 15% from last week and 16% ahead of the five year average for Texas.

The winter wheat crop is rated 50% good to excellent down 1% from a week ago and down 14% from a year ago. Kansas winter wheat is rated 45% good to excellent. That’s an increase of 3% from last week. Nebraska is rated 43% good to excellent. A drop of 23% from last week. Colorado is holding at 31% good to excellent, but 16% is still rated very poor. Oklahoma is the only other state with double digit very poor rating at 14% very poor. Oklahoma also has 46% of the winter wheat crop rated good to excellent.

Pasture and range condition is not fairing well in the heat and wind. Kansas pasture and range fell 6% to 49% good to excellent. Nebraska pasture and range also fell 6% to 66% good to excellent.

Topsoil and subsoil moisture both saw double digit drops week to week in several states. Kansas topsoil is now considered 47% adequate to surplus. Down 15% from last week. Nebraska topsoil moisture is rated 61% adequate to surplus down 16% from last week. New Mexico has the driest top soil with a 45% very short rating. Kansas subsoil moisture is rated 59% adequate to surplus down 9% from last week. Nebraska subsoil moisture is rated 74% adequate to surplus. That is down 12% from last week. Some state are still near saturated at the subsoil level. Alabama is rated 93% adequate to surplus for subsoil moisture.

See the full crop progress report here: https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/pk02cx87g/rx914b27v/prog2520.pdf

Clay Patton recaps the report here:

 

Livestock producers across the state have been adversely affected by manufacturing closures and changing consumer demand due to COVID-19. This has translated into dramatic reductions in revenue. The SBS Grant allocates working capital to help cover Nebraska livestock producers’ operating expenses, enabling them to return to stability and profitability.

Steve Wellman, Director of Agriculture for the state of Nebraska explains why they put this program together…

Who is eligible?
Nebraska livestock producers with 1 to 10 employees that have closed or sustained a loss of revenue or employment since March 13, 2020, are eligible to apply. The following industries are eligible:
– Beef Cattle Ranching and Farming (NAICS 112111)
– Dairy Cattle and Milk Production (NAICS 11212)
– Hog and Pig Farming (NAICS 1122)
– Poultry and Egg Production (NAICS 1123)
– Sheep/Goat Farming (NAICS 1124)

Funds Distribution
Nebraska Dept. of Economic Development expects to award individual grants of $12,000 to eligible businesses, for a total of approximately $330,000,000. Nebraska Livestock producers must have at least 20 animal units. Two-thirds (2/3) of gross income must come from Farming or Ranching. The State of Nebraska will be providing transparent reporting on the CARES Act funds and names of recipients will be made public.

 

How can the grant be used?
Livestock producers can use the SBS grant as working capital to pay for operating expenses, with the purpose of helping the producer maintain or bounce back during the period of economic downturn.

 

Preparing to apply
A PDF version of the full application can be found here to be used in preparation. Please note that DED will NOT accept PDF applications. You must use the hyperlink in the Eligibility Certification to submit your application.
– Download the User Guide Here – https://getnebraskagrowing.nebraska.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/2020-Business-Stabilization-Application-Guide.pdf.
– Download Preparation PDF Here – https://getnebraskagrowing.nebraska.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/NE-Business-Stabilization-Livestock-Application.pdf.

See the Application Guidelines for more information on eligibility, the use of funds, instructions on how to apply and the selection process.

Download Application Guidelines PDF Here – https://getnebraskagrowing.nebraska.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Small-Business-Stabilization-Program-Guidelines-for-Businesses-and-Livestock-Producers.pdf.

 

How to apply
If eligibility requirements are met, the grant-seeking livestock producer should submit an electronic Eligibility Certification to DED by the deadline below. The Eligibility Certification will be used to verify that the livestock producer is a Nebraska taxpayer that has employees in the state. If the livestock producer is validated, it will receive an invitation to submit a full application, which must be submitted by the deadline below.

For a business, you will need the following: Business Name, Email, State ID (tax ID).

For an individual (sole proprietorship), you will need the following: Name, Email, Social Security Number, Driver’s License Number, Date issued for DL, Adjusted gross income for most recent tax return

 

Application deadlines
Eligibility submission opening date – June 15, 2020 at 8 am CT
Eligibility submission deadline – June 26, 2020 at 5 pm CT
Eligibility notification date (via email from the State) – June 15, 2020 – June 26, 2020
Application begin date – June 15, 2020 at 8 am CT
Application deadline – June 26, 2020 at 5 pm CT

 

Questions?
Contact: 855-264-6858 or click here…. https://getnebraskagrowing.nebraska.gov/ag-grants/.