Tag Archives: wheat

Farmers across the state have access to many of the most cutting-edge wheat varieties ever bred. These varieties are all created with performance in mind, so how can producers gain that coveted yield bump when the dozens of varieties at their fingertips are all, by-and-large, on a fairly level playing field? According to Dr. Romulo Lollato, Wheat and Forage Extension Specialist at Kansas State University, the genetics of all the newest varieties have improved to the point where agronomic practices now have an even greater influence on yield than variety selection does.
“I think we are at the point where we have so many excellent varieties that we don’t have to be quite as picky. There are a lot of really good options, so we have to look at management, as well,” said Lollato. “That’s what the last 19 years of data that we have collected is telling us – that management practices are very, very important.”
According to this data, management accounts for 44-77% of yield variation. Because of this large yield gap, Lollato says, “It is time to manage wheat.”
To no one’s surprise, region and irrigation make the top of the list for yield producing management practices, but application of foliar fungicide and sowing date are also incredibly important for both irrigated and dryland farmers. The largest yield drag was dual-purpose wheat used for grazing.

Sowing dates can have a huge impact on final yields, but the optimal sowing date varies by region. Western Kansas farmers have an optimal date of October 1, north central’s optimal date is October 10 and south central’s is October 12. Planting after these optimal dates can mean substantial yield penalties. The South Central region loses about 1.1 bushels per day for around 20 days following October 12, but that loss increases to around 2.7 bushels per day after those initial 20. North Central Kansas consistently loses about 2.1 bushels per day, while the western region loses a whopping 3.5 bushels.

Lollato and his team have also found that seed treatments (like insecticides and fungicides) have a higher yield bump in good seasons, while foliar fungicides are beneficial in all seasons, but have more yield gain in those higher yielding seasons. Micronutrient applications have had a negligible bump during high performing years, while they have a monster gain of 9.7 bushels per acre during low performance years.

Lollato’s research has also focused on sulfur. Kansas has seen the removal of sulfur from the soil during wheat production exceeding the amount of atmospheric deposition since 2000, which he attributes as an effect of the Clean Air Act. This legislation has meant lower levels of air pollution, but less pollution means less sulfur coming in during rainfall. Sulfur application has a slight yield drag of -.6 bushels per acre during high performing years (like 2016 and 2017) but had a net gain of around 4.9 bushels per acre during drier years like 2018. He also advised that while sulfur and nitrogen deficiencies tend to have a similar yellowed appearance in plants, sulfur tends to express a brighter yellow discoloration in the upper plant canopy while nitrogen discolors the lower canopy.L
Although management practices are the most reliable source of yield gain, variety traits can have an effect. Stripe rust resistance was the trait with the highest yield gain, but there are others to keep an eye on depending on region and management practices. In the western region’s irrigated wheat, stripe rust, coleoptile length, straw strength and winterhardiness are the highest yielding traits. For dryland wheat, those traits are drought tolerance, coleoptile length, first hollow stem date and stripe rust.
In the central region, if you’re planning on applying fungicide, look for medium to late heading, drought tolerance, acid soil tolerance and medium to short height. With no fungicide application, those high yielding traits are stripe rust tolerance, leaf rust tolerance, fall grazing potential, early heading date and drought tolerance.
These projects were funded by the Kansas Wheat Commission and the Kansas Wheat Alliance. For more information on these research projects and others, please visit kansaswheat.org and kswheatalliance.org.

President Donald Trump’s recent comments on wheat exports to Japan have generated some negative press among one of his biggest groups of supporters.

The Hagstrom Report says when the president was speaking in Pennsylvania, one of the topics was the U.S. trade deficit with Japan. Trump said, “They send thousands, even millions of cars to us. We send them wheat. That’s not a good deal. And they don’t even want our wheat. They do it because they want us to at least feel that we’re okay.”

The National Association of Wheat Growers responded quickly via Twitter. “Mr. President, Japan is the number one market for U.S. wheat exports on average, where we hold just over 50 percent of the market. They don’t buy our wheat because ‘they want us to feel okay.’ They buy it because it’s the highest-quality wheat in the world. That’s not fake news.”

The negative reaction to Trump’s statement followed farmers venting about the administration’s policies when Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue appeared at Farmfest in Minnesota.

*Editor note*   Ag Secretary Perdue will be at  the Nebraska State Fair on Friday, August 23 for a town hall event at 11:30 in the Raising  Nebraska Building.

MANHATTAN, Kan. — A Kansas wheat farmer testified in front of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry on “Perspectives on Reauthorization of the U.S. Grain Standards Act” on Wednesday, July 31, 2019.

Brian Linin, a farmer from Goodland and member of the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers, provided testimony about the importance of the Federal Grain Inspection Service on behalf of wheat farmers.

“The farmer works to provide the highest quality product that feeds the world. FGIS helps ensure that our customers are receiving the exact specifications that they need,” said Linin. “We’ve provided a lot of information on milling quality, the inspection services and our production processes to our buyers giving them more confidence in our high quality product that other countries can’t always ensure.”

The U.S.’s grain inspection system, authorized through the Grain Standards Act, provides certainty to our foreign customers that all U.S. grains and oilseeds have been inspected and certified by an independent agency. This service is a great, unique value to U.S. commodities and is an important enhancement for our products on the competitive world market.

“As a grower of winter wheat, among other crops, I wanted to be with you here to serve as a voice for fellow wheat farmers across the country about the importance of maintaining a smooth export system,” said Linin. “It’s been a very difficult few years for farmers. Having a functioning and respected grain inspection system has enabled the U.S. to be a reliable exporter and facilitate continued demand for our commodities. When we’ve seen disruptions to our grain inspection system in the past it has resulted in billions of dollars of lost value throughout the production chain.”
The Grain Standards Act serves a critical role in exporting grains and oilseeds, including U.S. wheat, of which about 50% is exported each year. U.S. wheat exports increased despite bearish factors such as a strong U.S. dollar, uncertainty about U.S. trade policies, and difficult inland transportation logistics. A properly functioning grain inspection system is critical.

“The grain inspection system is one that is valued by our overseas customers and adds value to our commodities,” Linin reported. “Foreign customers can be assured that an independent agency has certified shipments to meet the grade requirements specified in a contract. This certainty and reliability has helped wheat and other U.S. commodities to grow our export markets and serves as a significant advantage of purchasing U.S. wheat versus wheat from other origins.”

Other testimonies for the committee were provided by Tom Dahl, president of the American Association of Grain Inspection and Weighing Agencies, Bruce Sutherland, member of the board of directors for the National Grain and Feed Association and Nick Friant, chairman of the Grades & Inspections Committee North American Export Grain Association. For the Brian Linin’s full written testimony, please visit kansaswheat.org.

MANHATTAN, Kan. — The Kansas Association of Wheat Growers will hold its annual membership meeting on August 14, 2019, in conjunction with High Plains Journal’s Sorghum U – Wheat U event.

The annual meeting will begin at 7:00 a.m., in the Fire Club Room at the Kansas Star Event Center, 777 Kansas Star Drive in Mulvane.

Grower members will discuss and debate the policies of the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and will vote on renewing KAWG Resolutions. They will hear an update on KAWG activities and priorities, as well as the announcement of a membership referral program that can earn members some unique wheat gear while building grassroots support for the issues facing wheat farmers in Topeka and Capitol Hill.

At the conclusion of the KAWG annual meeting, members are invited to join other wheat and grain sorghum producers to stay for the Sorghum U – Wheat U educational event, which features breakout sessions on grain sorghum and wheat. There is no charge to attend the Sorghum U – Wheat U event, and lunch will be provided.

Wheat and sorghum producers can take home real-world, practical solutions that can have a definite influence on their bottom line. With educational sessions targeted to wheat growers, sorghum growers and sessions for both, producers can develop a strategy that will allow them to take control and plan for profit. This event will also have CEU credits offered. Having multiple sessions and speakers filled with knowledge, this event will benefit any farmer that attends.

Registration begins at 8:30 a.m., with the program starting at 9 a.m. During the welcome session, attendees will hear from a panel of farmers as well as the Kansas Wheat and Kansas Grain Sorghum organizations.

During Breakout Blocks 1 and 2, farmers will be able to choose from the following four sessions: Making “Cents” of Blockchain Technology, Make Cropping Systems Work For You, Lessons in Wheat Production and Risk Management for Sorghum Producers. These blocks will repeat, so farmers will have the opportunity to attend two of the four. Kansas State University Wheat and Forages Extension Specialist Romulo Lollato will present the session on wheat production.

Over lunch, Arlan Suderman, chief commodities economist with INTL FCStone, will present the keynote address on “Market Intelligence for the Future.” Market intelligence helps producers plan ahead for influences on grain markets that are out of a producer’s control. Suderman has years of experience working with farmers and helping them understand the markets. From late planting problems this spring to trade wars to African Swine Fever, Suderman will give producers an outlook that will help them make sound decisions. Following Suderman’s presentation, John Lawrence will be speaking on “IntelliFarms: Grow with a Purpose.”

Topics for Breakout Blocks 3 and 4 include Planning with Your Lender, Making the Grain Chain Work for You, Risk Management for Wheat Producers and Growing Forage Sorghum for Profit. The event will wrap up at 3:00 p.m., following the IntelliFarms $20,000 Giveaway.

For more information on the speakers and topics and to register for this free event, go to wheatu.com.

The Kansas Association of Wheat Growers will hold its annual membership meeting on August 14, 2019, in conjunction with High Plains Journal’s Sorghum U – Wheat U event.

The annual meeting will begin at 7:00 a.m., in the Fire Club Room at the Kansas Star Event Center, 777 Kansas Star Drive in Mulvane.

 

Grower members will discuss and debate the policies of the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and will vote on renewing KAWG Resolutions. They will hear an update on KAWG activities and priorities, as well as the announcement of a membership referral program that can earn members some unique wheat gear while building grassroots support for the issues facing wheat farmers in Topeka and Capitol Hill.

 

At the conclusion of the KAWG annual meeting, members are invited to join other wheat and grain sorghum producers to stay for the Sorghum U – Wheat U educational event, which features breakout sessions on grain sorghum and wheat. There is no charge to attend the Sorghum U – Wheat U event, and lunch will be provided.

 

Wheat and sorghum producers can take home real-world, practical solutions that can have a definite influence on their bottom line. With educational sessions targeted to wheat growers, sorghum growers and sessions for both, producers can develop a strategy that will allow them to take control and plan for profit. This event will also have CEU credits offered. Having multiple sessions and speakers filled with knowledge, this event will benefit any farmer that attends.

 

Registration begins at 8:30 a.m., with the program starting at 9 a.m. During the welcome session, attendees will hear from a panel of farmers as well as the Kansas Wheat and Kansas Grain Sorghum organizations.

 

During Breakout Blocks 1 and 2, farmers will be able to choose from the following four sessions: Making “Cents” of Blockchain Technology, Make Cropping Systems Work For You, Lessons in Wheat Production and Risk Management for Sorghum Producers. These blocks will repeat, so farmers will have the opportunity to attend two of the four. Kansas State University Wheat and Forages Extension Specialist Romulo Lollato will present the session on wheat production.

 

Over lunch, Arlan Suderman, chief commodities economist with INTL FCStone, will present the keynote address on “Market Intelligence for the Future.” Market intelligence helps producers plan ahead for influences on grain markets that are out of a producer’s control. Suderman has years of experience working with farmers and helping them understand the markets. From late planting problems this spring to trade wars to African Swine Fever, Suderman will give producers an outlook that will help them make sound decisions. Following Suderman’s presentation, John Lawrence will be speaking on “IntelliFarms: Grow with a Purpose.”

 

Topics for Breakout Blocks 3 and 4 include Planning with Your Lender, Making the Grain Chain Work for You, Risk Management for Wheat Producers and Growing Forage Sorghum for Profit. The event will wrap up at 3:00 p.m., following the IntelliFarms $20,000 Giveaway.

 

For more information on the speakers and topics and to register for this free event, go to wheatu.com.

This is day 16, the final day of the 2019 Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Wheat harvest has essentially wrapped up in Kansas with last week’s hot dry weather.

According to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, Kansas winter wheat harvest is 96 percent complete, near 100 last year and 98 for the five-year average.

Erik Lange, Senior Vice President and chief operating officer, MKC, says their more than 40 locations across Kansas have taken in about two-thirds of their 5-year average on bushels, due to reduced acres because of the wet conditions last fall. MKC is located in 24 counties across Kansas, from Seward County in the southwest to Sumner County in south central to Pottawatomie County in the north east.

Lange reported that overall, harvest was about 2 to 2 ½ weeks later than normal statewide but a little less delayed in the west. He said yields varied widely across the state.

In south central counties, yields were below average, and in central counties, yields were quite a bit lower than normal, due to rain. Further to the north and east, there were good yields in areas, but not in the low lying areas. He said that in southwest Kansas, this year’s harvest was some of the best wheat in years.

Test weights in the trade territory ranged from average to above average in most locations. There were a few places in central and south central Kansas that got some rains on mature wheat where test weights were slightly below average.

Proteins also varied by location. In the west, Lange reported that proteins were well below average, ranging from 10 ½ to 11 ½ percent, with spotted areas of 12s. In central and south central Kansas, proteins ranged from 10 ½ to 12 percent, which is above a normal average of 10 ½ to 11 percent.

Lange reported that most of harvest is wrapped up, but they are still waiting on mudholes. He said, “Spring was a battle. We appreciate the rain, but timing could have been better.”

He said acres that were planted late were not as good as the early planted. He predicts that acres may go up slightly in MKC’s trade territory this fall, but he is skeptical on how many acres that is, saying “If corn and beans come off in a timely manner, there may be some more wheat planted this fall. Weather played such a factor in acreage this year.”

Eric Sperber, GM/CEO at Cornerstone Ag, in Colby, said this was “one of the quickest harvests we’ve had in a long time,” reporting that they took in 95% of their receipts between July 10-19.

Sperber said this year’s harvest was about 1 ½ to 2 weeks late. They took their first load of wheat on July 3; their previous latest start date was July 1.

He said that yields were excellent in northwest Kansas, with customers calling it their “best crop ever” and a “once in a lifetime crop.” Test weights were also very good, averaging 61.5 to 62 pounds per bushel. He reports that the proteins were the lowest average he has seen in his 15 years with Cornerstone, averaging 10.7 percent.

Sperber said they took in more hard white wheat this year than in the previous three years combined. He said the majority of the hard white wheat was the Kansas Wheat Alliance variety Joe, and that farmers were pleased with Joe. Some farmers reported that they planted Joe last fall because of concerns about wheat streak mosaic virus and its resistance to the disease.

Acres in the area were largely unchanged from the past couple years, but still some of the lowest acres in recent history. Sperber reports that they took in about 125 percent of normal receipts, due to the excellent yields.

“It was an excellent harvest,” he said. “It was about the fifth best total receipts in the 15 years I’ve been here, on some of the lowest acres.”

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 15 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Fields of wheat that are not yet harvested are fewer and farther between as harvest is wrapping up. Most farmers will be done by this weekend or the beginning of next week.

Roger Snodgrass, of McDougal-Sager & Snodgrass Grain Inc., in Rawlins County, reports that they are about 80% done with this year’s wheat harvest. Snodgrass says they missed out on most of the big rains this year and did not get too much hail. While they are seeing lower protein levels, they are also seeing above average yields and good test weights.

“Most of the guys are smiling around here and are happy with the crop that we are seeing,” says Snodgrass.

Theron Haresnape, a farmer near Lebanon in Smith County, says that wheat harvest is finally winding down. He said they didn’t receive any hail in their area, just rain showers.

Haresnape said, “It has been a pretty good year. The biggest rain we had all spring was 2.5 inches.”

With above average yields and protein levels in the area between 11.5 and 12%, Haresnape is pleased with this year’s wheat harvest. Haresnape says if the weather cooperates, they plan to increase acreage in the fall; however, he will still be planting 25-30% less than ‘normal.’

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 14 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

About two weeks behind schedule, wheat harvest in Kansas is progressing quickly with high temperatures this week about 100°F in northwest Kansas.

According to Larry Glenn, of Frontier AG Inc. in Quinter in Gove County, harvest is 85-90% complete in the area. Glenn reported that yields are above average in the western third of the state. Harvest was delayed and started out slow, but then moved very quickly.

Glenn said they started paying protein premiums last year and added protein testers in all locations. Protein is averaging about 10.5%.

Storage is an issue in the area, with the bunker in Quinter full. They are getting some rail cars in to start moving grain as the elevator space gets tight.

“We’ve been blessed with rains in this area,” Glenn said, adding that the rains didn’t come too much at a time like other areas. While there was some hail, it was spotty and didn’t cause widespread damage.

“We are well above last year on bushels, which was a good year,” Glenn said.

Larry Snow of Heartland Mills in Marienthal in Wichita County, reports that yields are way above average, but proteins are way below, estimating high 10s for most of the organic wheat they buy. Fortunately for the mill, they have been able to source higher protein wheat from other areas in the high plains.

“There will be a lot of 8s and 9s that would take too much to blend up, so it will end up as organic feed wheat,” said Snow. He said that harvest has been about two weeks late and is nearing completion. He added, “Test weights are really good.”

Ken Wood, who farms near Chapman in Dickinson County, wrapped up wheat harvest this last Saturday. Wood said they had good yields that were on higher ground in the fields and some lower yields where water stood for a longer period of time. Wood says they don’t test proteins, but they had solid test weight numbers for the year.

“I was pleased with the outcome that we had this year. It turned out better than we expected,” Wood said.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 13 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Harvest continues to roll through northern Kansas as farmers try to pick up the pace to make up for some lost time. Yields continue to be highly variable throughout the state, with some areas seeing double the county averages, while others are making 25-30 bushels per acre. Pockets of protein continue to be reported in localized areas of the state.

Lynn Moore, a farmer near Pittsburg, finished wheat harvest about two weeks ago. Moore says they had solid yields throughout harvest, and test weights ranged in the upper 50’s.

“It was unexpected for wheat harvest to go as well as it did, but we are just glad it is done and out of the field,” Moore said.

Dell Princ, of Midway Coop Association in Osborne County, reported that they are in the final stages of their wheat harvest this year.

“These are some of the best yields we have seen, considering the year we have had,” Princ said. With solid test weights and proteins ranging from 11-11.5%, Princ is pleased with this year’s harvest.

Chris Tanner, a farmer near Norton, reported that he began his harvest on July 4th (when they normally finish up) but had to press pause for rains until July 12. He is currently about halfway done. He estimates that this year’s county average is in the mid-50s, with some acres seeing upwards of 90 bushels an acre, but others averaging only 25 bushels per acre. Tanner says that fertilized fields are yielding much better, and that proteins in the area are ranging from 10.5-11%. Test weights are 61-63 pounds per bushel. The Syngenta/AgriPro variety Bob Dole is performing very well for Tanner.

“Weather made it difficult to get wheat drilled, and a lot of guys got it in late,” said Tanner. “Spring moisture made it hard to get fertilizer on. Everything has been a fight for us — calving, spraying, planting and overly saturated soils.”

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

Corn and soybean development continued to lag behind the average pace last week, but conditions for both crops rose slightly, according to the latest USDA NASS Crop Progress report released Monday.

As of Sunday, July 14, an estimated 17% of corn was silking, up 9 percentage points from the previous week but 25 percentage points behind the five-year average of 42%.

Corn condition, estimated at 58% good to excellent, was up 1 percentage point from 57% the previous week. That’s still the lowest good-to-excellent rating for this time of year in seven years.

“Among the top eight corn-producing states, Nebraska has the highest good-to-excellent rating at 77%, while Ohio and Indiana are at the bottom with 38% and 39%, respectively,” said DTN Lead Analyst Todd Hultman. “In Missouri, only 32% of corn was rated good to excellent.”

Soybean development also remained behind normal last week. NASS estimated that 95% of the soybean crop that was planted had emerged as of Sunday, 4 percentage points behind the five-year average of 99%. Twenty-two percent of soybeans were blooming, up 12 percentage points from the previous week but 27 percentage points behind the five-year average of 49%.

The soybean crop’s good-to-excellent rating of 54% was up 1 percentage point from 53% the previous week. As with corn, the soybeans’ good-to-excellent rating is the lowest in seven years.

“Again, Nebraska tops the list with 71% of soybeans rated good to excellent, while Ohio was at 33%,” Hultman said.

Winter wheat harvest moved ahead another 10 percentage points last week to reach 57% complete as of Sunday, behind last year’s 72% and 14 percentage points behind the five-year average of 71%.

“The Kansas harvest is 81% complete, while Missouri, Texas and Oklahoma are all within 4 percentage points of being finished,” Hultman said.

Seventy-eight percent of the spring wheat crop was headed, jumping 22 percentage points from 56% the previous week, but was 9 percentage points behind the five-year average of 87%.

Spring wheat condition was rated 76% good to excellent, down 2 percentage points from the previous week’s 78% good to excellent, but still a high rating for the crop for this time of year, Hultman said.

Twenty-four percent of sorghum was headed, 7 percentage points behind the five-year average of 31%. Sorghum coloring was estimated at 14%, behind the average of 19%. Sorghum condition was rated 74% good to excellent. Oats were 87% headed, behind the average of 95%.

Cotton squaring reached 60% as of Sunday, behind the average pace of 69%. Cotton setting bolls was 20%, also behind the average of 25%. Cotton condition was rated 56% good to excellent, up 2 percentage point from the previous week’s 54% good to excellent. Twenty-four percent of rice was headed, behind the average of 31%. Rice condition was rated 67% good to excellent.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/…. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

Clay Patton recaps the report here: https://post.futurimedia.com/krvnam/playlist/futures-one-crop-progress-report-conditions-improve-but-still-behind-7139.html

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Silking 17 8 59 42
Soybeans Emerged 95 90 100 99
Soybeans Blooming 22 10 62 49
Winter Wheat Harvested 57 47 72 71
Spring Wheat Headed 78 56 91 87
Cotton Squaring 60 47 70 69
Cotton Setting Bolls 20 13 30 25
Sorghum Headed 24 22 30 31
Sorghum Coloring 14 13 19 19
Barley Headed 75 55 88 89
Oats Headed 87 74 95 95
Rice Headed 24 16 30 31

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP = Very Poor; P = Poor; F = Fair; G = Good; E = Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 3 9 30 48 10 3 9 31 47 10 3 6 19 51 21
Soybeans 3 9 34 46 8 3 9 35 46 7 2 6 23 53 16
Spring Wheat 4 20 66 10 3 19 70 8 1 3 16 67 13
Cotton 3 12 29 47 9 2 17 27 47 7 10 18 31 34 7
Sorghum 1 2 23 61 13 1 2 24 61 12 5 12 36 43 4
Barley 5 19 62 14 1 4 22 63 10 1 2 12 70 15
Oats 2 5 25 57 11 2 5 28 56 9 4 3 22 58 13
Rice 1 6 26 50 17 1 6 27 49 17 1 5 25 56 13

**

National Soil Moisture Condition – 48 States
(VS = Very Short; SH = Short; AD = Adequate; SR = Surplus)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR
Topsoil Moisture 4 17 67 12 3 12 70 15 13 25 57 5
Subsoil Moisture 3 13 72 12 3 10 70 17 11 26 58 5