Tag Archives: Winter Wheat

With Thanksgiving quickly approaching fall row crop harvest is almost complete across the US. According to NASS on Sunday November 8th 91% of the US corn crop was harvested. Still maintaining that 10+% lead to the five year average. Most of the Midwest is racing to the finish of corn harvest. Illinois leads at 95%, Iowa and Kansas are right behind at 94%. Nebraska is also in contention at 93% complete on corn harvest. National soybean harvest is now 92% complete. Just 2% ahead of the 5 year average. Nebraska has crossed the finish line at 100% complete. Iowa is almost there at 98% complete . Illinois is right behind Iowa at 96% and Kansas rounds out the top at 90%. Most states are 80+% complete with soybean harvest. Except Tennessee which is 71% complete, 7% behind the five year average. Sorghum harvest is now 90% complete nationwide. Nebraska is now 95% complete. Kansas is now 97% complete for sorghum harvest.

Winter wheat is the next main portion of the fall crop progress report. Winter wheat planting is still crawling forward now 93% complete across the country. Just 2% ahead of the five year average. Nebraska and South Dakota reached 100% last week. Kansas is almost there this week at 97%.

Winter wheat emergence continues to be on pace with the five year average. Nationwide 79% of the winter wheat is emerged  nationally. That is right at the five year average of 78%. Nebraska winter wheat is 94% emerged, 3% behind the five year average. Kansas winter wheat is 84% emerged, 4% ahead of the five year average.

Winter wheat condition improved for it’s second straight week nationwide up 2% to 45% good to excellent. Nebraska winter wheat improved 2% as well to 43% good to excellent. Kansas improved 3% to 31% good to excellent. California remains the top winter wheat crop in the country with an unchanged rating week to week of 95% good to excellent.

Finally soil moisture continues to deteriorate across most of the country. Nebraska topsoil moisture dropped 3% week to week to 29% adequate to surplus. Kansas topsoil moisture dropped 4% to 38% adequate to surplus. Nebraska subsoil moisture dropped 1% to 33% adequate to surplus. Kansas subsoil moisture dropped 1% go 37% adequate to surplus.

You can read the full crop progress report here:

https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/xw42p121t/j0990326g/prog4620.pdf

Clay Patton recaps the whole report here:

The pace of harvest slowed again nationwide last week, but progress for both the corn and soybean harvest remained ahead of normal, according to the USDA NASS weekly Crop Progress report released on November 2nd.

Starting with Corn harvest the needle moved ahead 10% week to week at 82% complete. That is still 13% ahead of the five-year average of 69%. In the state break down big I states like Illinois (89%) and Iowa (87%) were nearly double or almost triple the harvest progress of a year ago. Nebraska corn harvest is 86% complete and Kansas corn harvest is 90% complete.

Meanwhile, soybean harvest slowed to a crawl last week, gaining just 4% to reach 87% complete as of Sunday. That puts this year’s current harvest progress 4% percentage points ahead of the five-year average of 83%. Nebraska and North Dakota are the first states to hit 100% soybean harvest according to NASS. Iowa soybean harvest is almost there at 97%. Kansas soybean harvest has a little more ground to go at 83%. All of these states though are well ahead of the year ago levels.

Winter wheat planting like harvest slowed last week, moving ahead  4% to 89% as of Sunday. That is 3% ahead of the five-year average of 86%. An estimated 71% of winter wheat had emerged, 1 percentage point ahead of the five-year average of 70%. In the state break down South Dakota and Nebraska are the first states to finish winter wheat planting. Kansas winter wheat planting is 95% complete.

The condition of the winter wheat crop was estimated at 43% good to excellent, up 2% from the previous week but down from 57% a year ago. Nebraska winter wheat dropped 2% to 41% good to excellent. Kansas winter wheat dropped 1% to 28% good to excellent. California hosts the best winter wheat in the country with a rating of 95% good to excellent.

See the full report here: https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/js9576006/zg64vb153/prog4520.pdf

Listen to a recap of the report here:

As the calendar rolls into the last week of October the NASS crop progress report is quickly dwindling down to the final pages. The October 26th report shows fall row crop harvest is quickly nearing the finish line, soil moisture continues to be extremely dry, and winter wheat receives it’s first condition rating.

Corn harvest is almost three quarters complete across the country at 72%. That is a 12% increase week to week and 16% ahead of the five year average. In the state break down Kansas is 85% complete, Iowa is 78% complete, and Nebraska is 76% complete. Of those three states Nebraska  saw the largest weekly increase is 18%.

Soybean harvest across the country increased another 8% week to week now to 83% complete. That is up 10% from the five year average. Iowa is 94% complete with soybean harvest. Nebraska is 97% complete and Kansas is 78% complete with soybean harvest.

Sorghum harvest is trying to catch up to corn and soybean harvest now 74% complete across the country. Nebraska sorghum harvested increased 21% week to week to 82% complete. That is 31% ahead of the five year average. Kansas sorghum harvest is up 15% week to week to 64% complete.

From fall harvest to looking at the first 2021 crop winter wheat planting is now 85% complete across the country. That is 5% ahead of the five year average. Nebraska (98%), Kansas (92%) and Colorado (99%) are all essentially complete  with winter wheat plantings. Those are all on pace or ahead of their respective five year average.

Winter wheat continues to emerge for most states ahead of the 5 year average pace. Nationwide 62% of the winter wheat has emerged. Northern plains states could see some wheat go into dormancy with a deep cold front move across the region. Nebraska has seen 84% of the states winter wheat emerge. Kansas has seen 70% of the states winter wheat emerge. Colorado has seen 78% of the winter wheat emerge. Nebraska (-5%) is the only state behind it’s five year average.

The first condition rating of the 2021 winter wheat crop is a stark contrast from 2020. The national winter wheat condition is rated 41% good to excellent. That compares to last year’s 66% good to excellent. Nebraska winter wheat is rated 43% good to excellent. Kansas winter wheat is rated 29% good to excellent. Colorado winter wheat is rated 24% good to excellent.

Pasture and range condition continues to be short with Nebraska range rated 33% good to excellent. Kansas pasture and range is rated 27% good to excellent. One state really stands out in the pasture and range condition and it’s one most may not think of first off. Maine’s pasture and range condition is now rated 100% poor to very poor.

Topsoil moisture continues to be in short supply with Kansas rated 23% adequate and Nebraska at 27% adequate. Wyoming topsoil is rated 78% short to very short. Subsoil moisture in Kansas is rated 30% adequate, In Nebraska 31% adequate to surplus, and Wyoming 87% short and very short.

See the complete report here:

https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/9880wg266/cz30qh965/prog4420.pdf

Clay Patton breaks down the report here:

MANHATTAN, Kan. – It may sound like a common refrain in farm country, but we sure could use some rain around here.

Kansas State University northeast area agronomist Stu Duncan talks weekly with extension agents across the state and many are sending the same message: The fall crop harvest has gone well, and much of next spring’s wheat crop is in the ground.

“But it is dry,” Duncan said. “It’s great weather for harvest, but not so good for seeding wheat. It’s going to take rain to get most of the later-seeded wheat up right now. And the ground is hard. That’s what we’re dealing with right now.”

Mary Knapp, the assistant state climatologist at K-State, said producers have “hopeful eyes” on a measure called the Quantitative Precipitation Forecast, which gives a picture of how much moisture might be received in the next seven days.

“The latest forecast (from Oct. 21) has a significant amount of rain falling in the eastern third of the state,” Knapp said. “The heaviest is in the southeast, where 1 ½ to 2 ½ inches might accumulate.”

She said the amount of rainfall expected through the end of October tapers off in the  north and west. “Further west, generally less than a quarter of an inch is expected,” Knapp said.

“Amounts less than a quarter of an inch will do little to improve conditions. One-quarter to 1 ½ inches will provide short-term relief, maybe enough to get wheat or other fall crops started.”

Unfortunately for farmers, Knapp said, a three month outlook beginning in November is for conditions that are warmer and drier than normal.

“What I can tell producers is that they should plan for a normal year, though I’m still not sure what a normal one is,” Duncan said. “As a farmer, you go for the norm, plan for success, but then be ready to pivot if you have to.”

In addition to satisfying their crops, farmers could use a little rain to help in restoring farm ponds or other supplies of water, and to anchor down some of the dry soil that is at risk for erosion. Duncan said the extension agents also are telling him that some farmers are getting a bit anxious about having enough feed to get livestock through the winter months.

An interview with Duncan is available online on the weekday radio program, Agriculture Today. Farmers can also get weekly updates from K-State Research and Extension in the Agronomy eUpdate, published by the Department of Agronomy.

More information on weather conditions, forecasts and other weather-related data in Kansas is available online from Kansas Mesonet.

As expected in the October 11 crop progress report, harvest is racing ahead with dry weather across much of the country. The dry though is hindering emergence of winter wheat and quickly depleting topsoil and subsoil moisture.

Row crops have essentially hit the final stages of maturity with corn maturity reaching a national rating of 94%, 7% ahead of the five year average. Soybean dropping leaves is now rated 93% nationwide, 3% ahead of the five year average.

As for harvest national corn harvest jumped from 25% complete last week to 41% complete this week. That is 9% ahead of the five year average. In the state by state break down Nebraska has harvested 34% of the state’s corn and Kansas has harvested 63% of the states corn. Both jumped 10+% week to week and are well ahead of the five year average. Big I-states are quickly approaching the halfway mark on corn harvest with Illinois at 45%, Indiana 34%, and Iowa 42% corn harvested. Soybean harvest nationwide is 61% complete, 19% ahead of the five year average and up 23% from last week. Nebraska has harvested 82% of the state’s soybean crop. That more than doubles the five year average of 39% and almost quadruples year ago harvest levels which were just 24%. Kansas soybean harvest is 40% complete. That perfectly doubles the five year average. Big I-states soybean harvest continues to roll on with Illinois 56%, Indiana 52% and Iowa 78% complete. Finally sorghum harvest is keeping just ahead of the five year harvest with 49% of the national harvest complete. Nebraska has harvested 31% of the states sorghum. That is 8% ahead of the five year average.

Crop conditions deteriorated on the national scale this week with key states seeing a decent drop. Nationally corn is rated 61% good to excellent, down 1% from last week. Nebraska corn increased 2% week to week to 63% good to excellent. Kansas corn is unchanged week to week at 54% good to excellent. Iowa corn dropped 1% to 44% good to excellent. Illinois corn though saw an 8% drop to 68% good to excellent. The national soybean condition dropped 1% as well to 63% good to excellent. Nebraska soybeans were unchanged week to week at 63% good to excellent. Kansas soybeans increased 3% to 56% good to excellent. Iowa soybeans were unchanged week to week at 49% good to excellent. Illinois soybeans fell 9% to 66% good to excellent. Nationally sorghum dropped 1% to 50% good to excellent. Nebraska sorghum improved 8% to 68% good to excellent.

Winter wheat planting could possibly be finished in the next two weeks with the current pace being  set. Nationally 68% of the winter wheat crop is planted, 7% ahead of the five year average and up 16% from last week. In the state by state break down Colorado has the most winter wheat planted at 94%. Followed by Nebraska at 89%. South Dakota at 88% and Kansas was further away at 74% planted.

Dry conditions are slowing Nebraska winter wheat emergence, but nationwide 41% of the crop has emerged. That is 6% ahead of the five year average. Kansas has 50% of the winter wheat crop emerged, up 18% from the five year average. Nebraska has 60% of the winter wheat crop emerged, down 8% from the five year average.

Pasture and range conditions continue to drop week to week. Nebraska range dropped 2% to 36% good to excellent. Kansas pasture dropped 6% yo 32% good to excellent. Wyoming has some of the poorest range in the Midwest with only 1% being rated good and 0% excellent. Wyoming has 70% of the pasture and range rated poor to very poor.

Topsoil moisture in Kansas has taken large drops the last couple of weeks. Dropping 10% to 28% adequate to surplus this week. That is 23% drop in the last two weeks. Nebraska topsoil dropped 6% this week to 27% adequate to surplus. Dropping 13% over the last two weeks. Subsoil moisture in Kansas dropped 8% to 39% adequate to surplus. Nebraska subsoil dropped 4% to 34% adequate to surplus.

You can view the full report here:

https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/hd76sq359/pg15c454g/prog4220.pdf